Propliners, warbirds and bushplanes by Ken Swartz


Photos © Ken Swartz

Ken Swartz shares my interest in vintage aircraft and aviation history. His focus includes the vintage large multi propellor aircraft as well as 'sky trucking' bushplanes.
Comments with the photographs are mainly Ken's, additional information is sometimes added by the webmaster.
The additions you'll find at the bottom of the page, though I also inserted some updates chronological.

 

Zantop's Electra's languishing at Willow Run
Lockheed Electra's at YIP
Ken wrote: "I visited the Detroit area in June 2009 and came across propliners at The Henry Ford Museum and Willow Run Airport.
At the latter I was disappointed by the declining population of propliners, with the five remaining Zantop L-188s appear to be destined for the scrapyard.
In the mid-1990s, you could walk amongst 30+ propliners (CV580, CV600, DC-4, DC-6, Convair 240, L-188, Beech 18, Volpar) but the scrapman has taken most of these aircraft away, after they were first stripped of their engines. See Ian MacFarlane's page.
On these photos are five remaining L-188s, all without engines.
There were still a couple of Convairs at the north end of the field, but they were too far away to identify." 

C-7 Caribou at Willow Run, being restored

The Yankee Air Museum's DHC-4 (c/n 2) was recently painted up in U.S. Army colours. A Toronto group tried to bring this, the second prototype DHC-4, back to the de Havilland Canada (DHC) factory at Downsview in 2008, but without success alas.
The serial of '24171' is false, the original 62-4171 (c/n 110) was transferred to the South Vietnam Air Force in 1972.

 

The Detroit News ran an item on DetNews.Com 15Sep09, reporting the Willow Run Airport 'in dire straights':
Nathan Hurst / The Detroit News
Van Buren Township -- Willow Run airport is facing severe financial problems and officials are considering a number of cost-saving options, from leasing the facility to possibly closing it.
The airport's future essentially depends on how quickly the economy rebounds and whether Willow Run can hang on until then.
It's a far cry from the heyday at the airport, which provided a major cargo launching point for Detroit's "Arsenal of Democracy" weaponry during World War II, and was carrying passengers before Metro Airport.
The authority cut Willow Run's budget to $5.88 million for fiscal year 2009, which ends Sept. 30, and is looking to cut it again in 2010, to $3.26 million.
In the end, the airlines pick up the overrun for Willow Run, since the authority doesn't take taxpayer dollars.
This year, the amount of cargo shuttling in and out of Willow Run has been running at less than half the levels seen last year, which were far below levels seen in 2007.
The number of operations at the airport -- a count of how many take-offs and landings -- is down significantly as well. That's due to a falloff in business from the Big Three automakers, as well as waning interest from general aviation and private charter operations.
Willow Run used to handle scheduled passenger service, but an agreement with the airlines operating at Metro Airport prohibits it from serving such flights, along with charter flights where tickets are sold publicly. So the airport's business relies on cargo and private air traffic.

B-17 'Yankee" B-17 Flying Fortress 'Yankee Lady'
The Yankee Air Museum has an excellent collection and is worthy of a visit. Part of its (flying) collection is this World war 2 bomber, "Yankee Lady".

The museum offered the following information:
B-17G-110-VE, N3193G, was delivered to the U. S. Army Air Corps as 44-85829, then transferred to the U. S. Coast Guard as PB-1G, BuNo 77255 in September 1946.
It served at NAS Elizabeth City, North Carolina until May 1959.
Ace Smelting Incorporated of Phoenix, Arizona bought it on May 11, 1959, gave it its current registration, then sold it to Fairchild Aerial Surveys of Los Angeles, CA the same month.
Aero Services Corporation of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania acquired it on August 2, 1965 and sold it to Beigert Brothers of Shickley, Nebraska on October 1, 1965.
Aircraft Specialties Incorporated of Mesa, Arizona bought it on March 19, 1966 and flew it as tanker c34 and later tanker #34.
It was flown to Hawaii in January 1969 to appear in the movie Tora Tora Tora.
Globe Air Incorporated of Mesa, AZ acquired it along with B-17G-85-DL, N9563Z on February 18, 1981. It is now named "Yankee Lady" and flies for the Yankee Air Museum at Yspilanti, Michigan.

C-47 476716

The Yankee Air Museum (YAM) is the owner and operator of this Douglas C-47 transport which is available for airshows, flybys & film and is also available for Member trips.
476716 (N8704) is a C-47D 'Skytrain' with c/n 16300/33048 and wears its original USAAF serial.
More info on the museum's website.

The Henry Ford (they have dropped the word 'Museum' from the name) is a must visit attraction on the scale of the Smithsonian in DC, with a rare collection of aircraft and a large park (Greenfield Village) full of historic buidings including the original bicycle shop and family home of the Wright brothers....
Fokker Universal


On May 9, 1926, Byrd and pilot Floyd Bennett attempted a flight over the North Pole in a Fokker F-VII Tri-motor called the 'Josephine Ford'. This flight went from Spitsbergen (Svalbard) and back to its take-off airfield. Byrd claimed to have reached the Pole. [Josephine Ford Arctic Expedition, Wikipedia]
The Fokker Universal of "Standard" was the first aircraft built in the United States that was based on the designs of Dutch-born Anthony Fokker, who had designed aircraft for the Germans during World War I. About half of the 44 Universals that were built between 1926 and 1931 in the United States were used in Canada. Among the famous pilots who flew the Fokker Universal were Punch Dickins and Walter Gilbert.
[Wikipedia]

 


The Aviation Galleries of The Henry Ford museum were re-modeled in 2003 to celebrate the U.S. Centennial of Flight.
These photos show a DC-3, Boeing 40, Ford Trimotor and Fokker Trimotor, plus the original Wright brothers bicycle shop where they did their early aviation work.
This brick building and the wooden Wright family home were moved from Dayton to Greenfield Village in Dearborn by Ford.
The museum is located across the street from what was the Ford Airport. The site is now used by Ford for design and development and includes a test track.
MUSEUM WEBSITE

DC-3 in the Henry Ford
Douglas DC-3-201B N21728 (c/n 2144) in the Heroes of the Sky gallery.


 

Kenneth I. Swartz visited the Canadian Bushplane Museum_Sault Ste Marie on 07Oct2014 and submitted photos of his visit. Due to time constraints and being museum aircraft and rather static I made the following compilations.

 Canadian Bushplane Museumat Sault Sainte Marie, visit by Ken Swartz

 Canadian Bushplane Museum_Sault Ste Marie

Ken Swartz added some notes on his visit to the Canadian Bushplane Museum:
"I found the following aircraft of most interest at the Museum:
1) CF-EIR_Fairchild F-11 Husky
Fairchild Aircraft of Canada built 12 F-11 Husky's at Longueuil, Quebec after the war.
The aircraft competed against the Beaver and lost a big order from the Ontario government.
The Husky had a rear loading hatch and could carry a canoe internally .. or sticking out the back of the aircraft. The cabin had more volume than the Beaver but it was underpowered (or often overloaded).
In the early 1960's former wartime Fairchild test pilot Archie MacKenzie reengined Husky CF-EIM in Vancouver with a British Alvis Leonides radial engine to provide more power. In the mid-1970s, Harrison Airways announced plans to put the Husky back into production.
The second Husky, C-FEIL was rebuilt using the original Fairchild tooling by Saunders Aircraft at their factory at Gimli, Manitoba and outfitted with a Alvis Leonides and flown to Vancouver as C-GCYV. When Harrison Airways went bankrupt in about 1977-1978, this aircraft sat outside at YVR and was acquired by the Western Canada Aviation Museum.

The WCAM was very active salvaging bush planes from crash sites in the 1970s and early 1980s. This included the prototype CF-BQC which crashed in BC and CF-MAN which crashed in the Yukon. Both these wrecks were seen on October 2014 in the WCAM storage yard at St Andrews Airport north of Winnipeg.

Two other Leonides Husky's on the west coast - CF-EIR and CF-SAQ - last flew with Island Air at the Campbell River, which became part of Air BC. In August 1980 both aircraft were were retired and dismantled at the Campbell River spit seaplane awaiting donations to museums.
Air BC donated CF-EIR to the WCAM and it later went to the Bushplane Museum. And AirBC CF-SAQ went to the Canadian Museum of Flight near Vancouver.

The last Husky in service was CF-EIM which spent most of its career from the late 1960s flying with Jack Anderson's North Coast Air Service at Seal Cove in Prince Rupert. It was the last airworthy Husky by 1980 and in about 1984-1985 had a landing accident and sank near Seal Cove. It was salvaged and donated in the summer of 1985 to the Canadian Museum of Flight and Transportation which already had CF-SAQ in its collection.

Vazar owns the STC for the most popular DHC-3 Turbo Otter kit.
In the 1990s, Vazar announced plans put the F-11 back into production as a single engine turboprop with a PT6 and bought a couple F-11s from Museums and these aircraft are reportedly stored on a farm in the Langley, or Abbotsford area, east of Vancouver.
There has been no recent news on this project. Vazar bought one or two Fairchild F-11s from museums.

2) C-FAYE DH 87 Dragon Rapide
This aircraft was acquired by the Museum from the family of George Lemay in Alberta after his death. It carries the registration of an earlier Canadian DH.87

3) CF-PSM-X DHC-2 Mk III
This is the prototype Turbo Beaver. It was used as a chase plane at DHC until it was involved in an accident in the late 1980s. It was moved to the DHC bone yard, accident sold for scrap, bought back by Boeing DHC and given initially to the DHC Employees Sports Club. It was displayed briefly at the Toronto Aerospace Museum in the Early 2000s, then donated to the Canadian Bushplane Museum where it was restored in about 2014 to its original markings.

4) The Saunders ST-27 was stretched twin PT-6 conversion of a four engine DH 114 Heron developed by David Saunders.
The first prototype ST-27, CF-YBM-X powered by PT6-A27s flew on 28May1969; 12 conversions were completed. Saunders Aircraft moved from Montreal-Dorval to Gimili Manitoba in early 1971.
The new ST-28 was being developed when the company folded in 1976.

 Canadian Bushplane Museum_Sault Ste Marie

 Canadian Bushplane Museum_Sault Ste Marie

Most of the aircraft of the Canadian Bushplane Museum listed below are found among the photos above:
CF-EIR Fairchild F-11 Husky
CF-BNI DH 83C__Sault Ste Marie_20141007
CF-BGN
C-FAYE DH 87 Dragon Rapide
CF-ADH
C-FODU DHC-3
CF-... Buhl, wreck
Beech 18
C-FUWE Beech 18
CF-FTC
CF-OBS
CF-PSM-X DHC-2 Mk III
RC-3
CL-215
S-2 Firecat
ST-27
C-FIXY FBA-2C1 Canadian Timberlands (CPX8) Bushplane Museum Dock, Sault Ste Marie
N378V DHC-2 - Bushplane Museum Dock, Sault Ste Marie (2014-10-07)
 


 

 

Ken Swartz recently shared these images (sent Feb.2017) with me as he had been on a glorious propliner roadtrip on the US westcoast last year.

Aerometal's restoration facility at Aurora Airport, Oregon.
N18121, on the left (behind yellow Stearman), on the right with blue strip and US flag: N341A and in the
back, without wings, an unidentified one.

C-47A N115SA at Aurora Airport, Oregon
Douglas C-47A N115SA at Aurora Airport on 09Aug2016. Still ways to go for restoration.
In 2012 I saw it at the Classic Aircraft Aviation Museum, but the museum wasn't open, had closed shop by then?

N115SA was registered 03Dec03 for First Flight Out Inc., Charlotte,NC. By Nov04 First Flight Out had ceased to operate and N115SA was offered for sale on eBay during Nov.2004; with a recorded ttl 27.863hrs.
Soon after it was located on private airstrip near Hondo,TX.
Reg'd 23Feb07 to James T.Hunt of La Habra Heights,CA. Reported on 26Oct07 at Chino,CA.
Then 25Jun09 it was reported as N1159, but this could be a mispole.
Since 12Nov09 registered to Classic Aircraft Aviation Museum of Portland, OR.

Roy Blewett advised me:"N115SA moved to Aurora from Hillsboro in Oct.2012 and is now owned by the Down Ampney Project. It will be restored into RAF D-Day markings and eventually go to the UK.
Further information here: www.aerometalinternational.com/kg587.html. (Info by Feb.2017)

I came across this N115SA in 2012 (see MY 2012 REPORT, which also has a link to a .pdf doc intercepted when it was offered for sale, providing interesting details.
My 2012 page also has details of its career since it started as C-47A and joined the war effort in 1944.

C-49 N15748 unmarked fuselage at Aerometal, Aurora, OR
This is Douglas C-49K N15748 (c/n 6337); it will never fly again.
Once exhibited inside the 'Museum of Flight' on Boeing Field, Seattle,WA. More on my Photo by Friends & Guests (46)

Ken wrote:
"Aerometal International is dedicated to the restoration, maintenance, and preservation of classic, vintage and warbird historic aircraft.
During my visit to Aurora Airport on August 2016, there were three DC-3s being restored inside the hangar for private clients. The restoration work we saw was extensive and included in-depth airframe inspections, anti-corrosion treatment, complete rewiring and the restoration of classic airline and VIP interiors.
A couple of the people working in the workshop on the day of our tour have also restored historic aircraft at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in nearby McMinnville, OR".

Republic RC-3 Seabee N6481K
This Republic RC-3 SeaBee N6481K (c/n 736) is preserved at the Evergreen Air Museum in McMinnville, Oregon.
Date of visit was 09Aug2016.
I am very fond of this peculiar aircraft, the Seabee, which enjoyed a second career as a bushplane. www.seabee.info
I visited this impressive museum in 2012, see My REPORT; the museum ran into financial difficulties and since 2012
various planes of the collection, were sold but I think there is till a lot to see and enjoy.

CV580 N580HW
Convair CV580 N580HW (c/n 2), operated by Honeywell Int'l Inc (registered to them since 1992!). PAE 08Aug16

Honeywell's CV580 is one of the oldest in the world. It is used to test fly modern avionics.
Several flight test aircraft are based at PAE, including the CV580 and an Eurocopter AS350 helicopter.
Paine Field, also known as Snohomish County Airport (IATA: PAE, ICAO: KPAE) is a small international airport
located in Snohomish County, between Mukilteo and Everett,WA.
The Honeywell PAE-base is supposed to close and these aircraft are expected to move to Arizona (or New Mexico?).

Beech 18 N103AF
Beech G18S N103AF (c/n BA-526); it is operated by Point-to-Point Air, a Seattle area charter service.
N013AF is seen here at Arlington (KAWO),WA on 08Aug2016. That is where I came across it too, my USA 2014


 

This update was added on 27Feb2017:

DHC-3 C-FSUB by Ken Swartz
deHavilland DHC-3 C-FSUB (c/n 8) of Air Mount Laurier at Sainte-Veronique (27May2016)

Air Mount Laurier has a float plane base in the Village of Sainte Veronique in the Rivière Rouge area.
The bush flying service has 6 fly-in camps on isolated lakes north of Sainte Veronique for hunting, fishing and wilderness adventures.
www.en.airmontlaurier.com/outfitters-packages-quebec-canada

The company also has a float plane base at LG4, which is a northern logistics hub serving Hydro-Québec's James Bay Project. The name refers to the the La Grande-4 hydroelectric generating station on the La Grande River.
The air service also has a remote caribou hunting camp in the far north of Quebec.

Sainte-Veronique is located 62 km north of St Jovite (now part of Mont-Tremblant) and 192 km Northwest of Montreal, Quebec.
Lake Ouimet in St Jovite was the site of the famous Grey Oaks resort founded by the Wheeler family in a wilderness area north of Montreal.
Grey Oaks resort was one of the first companies in Canada to use aircraft to fly guests to remote hunting and fishing camps, and Grey Oaks was one of the first Canadian resorts to have an airstrip and invite US pilots in the 1930s to fly directly to the resort for a holiday.

Wheeler Air Service operated a large fleet of floatplanes in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s to serve its guests and for charter to natural resource industries and government agencies.
Wheeler was a major contractor supporting construction of early warning radar lines in northern Canada in the 1950s and a prime contractor on the massive budworm spraying contracts in New Brunswick in the 1950.
After the Second World War, the Wheeler family helped develop the Mount Tremblant resort which ultimately became a bigger attraction than Grey Oaks.
The grass airport Wheeler build at Lake Ouimet still exists but float planes are no longer allowed on the lake and the famous Grey Oaks resources burnt down in the last decade...
No Bush planes or Propliners can be found at Lake Ouimet today, but Air Mount Laurier to the north carries on a tradition that Tom Wheeler began in the 1920s!


Karl E. Hayes wrote a lengthy article on Otter c/n 8 in his DHC-3 monograph, like 3 pages of text. I have cut it down a bit.

Msn 8 was delivered to the RCAF with serial 3662 on 28th March 1953, the same day as 3661, the Force's first Otter.
Its first assignment was to 408 Squadron, Rockcliffe, carrying the unit's MN code, the squadron history recording that by 2nd April '53 3662 was engaged on local pilot familiarisation flights. It was transferred to 102 Communications Unit, Trenton in September 1953.
Subsequently, date?, it joined 111 Communications & Rescue Flight at Winnipeg, taking that unit's PW code. It was involved in the rescue activity for USAF B-47 tail number 17013 which crashed in the Big Sandy Lake, Saskatchewan area on 12th February 1955

The Otters operated out of Winnipeg on wheel-skis during the winter, and on floats from Lac du Bonnet during the summer; 3662 continued in service with 111 Communications & Rescue Flight at Winnipeg until September 1957, when it went to No.6 Repair Depot at Trenton for storage as a reserve aircraft.

It was sold to DHC in June 1965, who converted it to civilian configuration.
The Otter was then sold to Coast Range Airways Ltd of Atlin,BC to whom it was registered on 7th February 1966 as CF-SUB. Atlin is in the northern part of the Province, near to the Yukon border. The Otter was hauling fuel, diamond drills and supplies for mining and exploration camps.
In the spring of 1967 Coast Range Airways was purchased by Trans North Turbo Air Ltd of Whitehorse, Yukon principally for its helicopter charter licence and its one Bell 47G helicopter.

Otter SUB continued to serve the mining industry, remaining registered to Coast Range Airways, then a subsidiary of Trans North Turbo Air. At that time, it was the only Otter in the vicinity of the Yukon and
was much in demand.
It was also used during the summers of 1966 and 1967 for water-bombing forest fires with a 'torpedo-type' tank hung under the fuselage. On 16th November 1967, the Otter received some damage at its Atlin base but was repaired.

In the fall of 1967, Trans North Turbo Air sold the fixed-wing portion of their fleet, a Super Cub, Beaver and the Otter SUB to Great Northern Airways Ltd of Calgary.
The Otter was reg'd to Great Northern Airways on 17th July 1968 and painted in a blue colour scheme with red cheat line.
During the summer of that year, a blown jug caused a forced landing onto Margaret Lake, a small lake north of Mayo in the Yukon. After the necessary repairs were made to the engine, the take-off was not so successful and the Otter went careening into the bush at the end of the lake, tearing the floats off and doing much damage to the fuselage.
The aircraft had to be slung out in pieces to a nearby strip and bushrepaired, using parts from a steel bed frame to re-enforce it for the ferry flight out. It headed south to Field Aviation, Calgary for repair and was then temporarily fitted with a set of borrowed amphibious floats, so that it could finish the season based out of Inuvik in the Northwest Territories.

CF-SUB continued to fly for Great Northern Airways until that carrier went bankrupt in December 1970. Its assets and licences were bought by International Jet Air Ltd of Calgary.
Their main interest was the 'E'-category licence which Great Northern had held, which enabled International Jet Air to establish a scheduled and charter service over the routes Great Northern had operated, using a fleet of Lockheed L188 Electras.
On 5th April 1971 Otter CF-SUB was registered to International Jet Air, but it was not operated by them and was kept in storage at Calgary.
They sold on the 'D'-licence (for DC-3 operations) to Northward Airlines of Edmonton, and the 'A-', 'B-' and
'C-'licences which Great Northern Airways had held (for operation of aircraft in the Cessna 185 up to Otter category) to Trans North Turbo Air, and included in the sale were four Beavers, two Aztecs and Otter SUB.
The Otter was registered C-FSUB to Trans North Turbo Air (1971) Ltd on 4th May 1972 and painted in an all yellow colour scheme with red trim.

The Otter was operated by Trans North Turbo Air alongside a fleet of Beavers and Turbo Beavers for the next seven years. For winter 1972 it was based out of Inuvik on wheel-skis, for reindeer management, seismic and oil exploration support.
During the summers it flew from Schwatka Lake, Whitehorse on floats.
During this period of operation with Trans North Turbo Air, there were a few incidents recorded but damages were repaired.

In 1978 Trans North Turbo Air decided to get out of single-engined fixed wing bush flying.
Otter C-FSUB was sold in the fall of 1978 to a Vancouver man named Walter Davidson, who was in the logging business, but its next operator was Tyee Airways Ltd of Sechelt, BC to whom it was registered on 23rd April 1979.
The Otter flew down to Sechelt, which is just north of Vancouver, where it joined the Tyee fleet of Beavers and Cessna 185s. Sechelt is a native word for 'place of shelter from the sea'.

The Otter did not stay long with Tyee Airways, and its next posting was in fact back to Whitehorse in the Yukon, where it joined the fleet of Air North Charter & Training Ltd, to whom it was registered on 12th June 1980, named 'Bert'.

Air North are one of the major operators in the Yukon and C-FSUB resumed its charter operations throughout the Territory, flying alongside Air North's other Otter C-FQOQ.
Only one incident is recorded while SUB was flying for Air North, exact date unknown, but it was not long after the Otter entered service with them. The accident site was about 250 miles from Dawson City. The Otter landed on a section of the Dempster Highway, which also served as an airstrip, but had run off the strip, causing considerable damage to the propeller, engine mount, cabin roof and a bent right wing.
The repairs were carried out by Denny McCartney, the whole episode being well described in his excellent book 'Picking Up The Pieces'. This book is a great and recommended read!

After 4 years of service in the Yukon with Air North, 'SUB returned to the Vancouver area when it was purchased by Harbour Air Ltd. It arrived in Vancouver on 4th October 1984
It emerged from the hangar on 21st March 1985 in full Harbour Air colours, on floats. It was registered to Harbour Air on 30th April 1985.
It flew with them for that summer, before heading north up the BC coast to Prince Rupert, where it was registered to North Coast Air Services Ltd on 1st November 1985. It joined their fleet of 4 Beavers, a Fairchild Husky and a Grumman Mallard and flew for North Coast for nearly 2 years.

Having served all of its commercial existence thus far in Western Canada, it then moved eastwards, where its next operator was V.Kelner Airways of Pickle Lake,ONT to whom it was registered on 3rd June 1987.
It flew that summer out of Pickle Lake and then moved further east, when it was acquired by Cargair Ltee of Quebec, to whom it was registered on 1st October 1987.
Since then, SUB has served with Cargair, based at St.Michel-des-Saints during the summer months on floats, being put into storage each winter.
The Otter was used to fly tourists, hunters and fishermen into the beautiful wilderness areas of Quebec. It also supports exploration camps in the James Bay area.

During the caribou hunting season of August/September each year, the Otter flies out of the LG-4 base on the La Grande river, flying the hunters to the James Bay region in search of their prey, before returning to St.Michel-des-Saints for winter storage.
As of May 2001, the Otter had accumulated 21,000 airframe hours.
' SUB was noted in the hangar at St.Michel-des-Saintes on 4th May 2004 having just had a new R-1340 engine installed. It entered the water the following day for the first flight of the 2004 summer season.

In 2007 the bush aircraft division of Cargair, including the Otter, was purchased by Air Mont Laurier (1985) Inc of Ste.Veronique, Quebec to whom C-FSUB was registered on 5th April 2007.
Air Mont Laurier also operate Otter C-GGSC (366), both Otters still with their original R-1340 engines.

 

DHC-3 C-GGSC by Ken Swartz (2016)
deHavilland DHC-3 C-GGSC (c/n 366) of Air Mount Laurier; also at Sainte-Veronique (27May2016)

Karl E. Hayes wrote a lengthy article on Otter c/n 366 in his DHC-3 Otter monograph. I have cut it down a bit to fit the purpose of this website and –page. It describes nicely its history and use over the years.

Otter msn 366 was delivered to the United States Army on 25th March 1960 with serial 59-2222.
It was allocated to Fort Riley,KS as an operational support aircraft and in April 1962 it joined the 17th Aviation Company, Fort Ord, California.
In February 1966 92222 joined the Otter Transition School at Fort Ord, CA where it acquired the nick name 'Quad Deuce'. Its role was to transport soldiers to and from Travis AFB and to transport VIPs and cargo to other military installations, notably Crissy Field, San Francisco.
Also included was aerial medical evacuation for wounded soldiers returning from Vietnam and participated in air shows and displays throughout California and Nevada.

92222 continued flying for the School until it closed. With the withdrawal of the Otter from service in Vietnam in the early part of 1971, there was no longer a need for an Otter Transition School.
In May '71 'Quad Deuce' moved to Fort Lewis, Seattle,WA as an operational support aircraft. In July 1972 its official record describes it as being loaned out for non-military use, which was the Environmental Protection Agency survey project.
This lasted until February 1976, when it joined the Army Electronics Command at Lakehurst NAS,NJ as a test aircraft.

In August 1976 'Quad Deuce' headed west, crossed the country to its new base at Fort Huachuca,AZ where it served as a test aircraft supporting the Electronic Proving Ground. The Otter continued flying from Fort Huachuca until its military career came to an end in April 1979.

On 24th April '79 it was transferred to the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) registered N5072F and assigned to the CAP's Southwest Region,TX.
It was put up for sale the following year, and by Bill of Sale dated 1st May 1980 was sold by the CAP to Waggoner Aircraft Inc of Wiley Post Airport, Bethany,OK.
At that stage of its career, it had 6,116 hours on the airframe.

On 8th July 1980 it was sold on by Waggoner Aircraft Inc to Air Ranger Ltd of Winnipeg. It appears that the Otter had remained in Texas, as it was ferried from there to Winnipeg, where it was overhauled by Manwest Aviation and registered C-GGSC to Air Ranger.
It was then sold to Raecom Air Ltd and headed north to its new base at Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories.

For the next seven years it flew out of Yellowknife, on floats during the summer and on wheel-skis in winter.
It was sold in August 1987 to Air Mont-Laurier (1985) Inc of Ste.Veronique - Lac Tiberiade,QUE.
At that stage, its airframe hours had increased to 8,272 and it was described as being in 'rough condition', after many years service in the harsh conditions of the Northwest Territories.
Between 5th and 7th August 1987 it was ferried Yellowknife-Stony Rapids-Thompson-Pickle Lake-Val D'Or-Laval for complete overhaul.

On 27th May '88 it arrived at its new base at Ste.Veronique and entered service with Air Mont Laurier.
Air Mont Laurier is a family business run by Norman Ouellette together with his wife and two sons, both bush pilots. As well as the Otter, the fleet comprised two Beavers and a Cessna 206. The aircraft were active during the summer months only, May to end September and were used to bring fishermen and hunters into the bush country to the north of Ste.Veronique. The company runs 4 fishing camps, the furthest away at Lac du Male, a flight of one hour 15 minutes.
Each year, from mid August to end September, the Otter heads north to Fort Chimo, Quebec for the annual caribou hunt, before returning to base where it is stored for the winter.

As at April 2001 the total time had increased to 13,031 hours. The Otter was still in service during the summer of 2004 and as we can see continues to do until the present day (2016).

Source: 'DHC-2 Otter - a history' by Karl E. Hayes (published 2005, with subsequent updates in 2007 & 2008).



 

DC-3 C-FDTD by Ken Swartz (2016)
Douglas DC-3 C-FDTD at St Hubert (YHU) - 21May2016
Montréal/Saint-Hubert Airport (IATA: YHU, ICAO: CYHU) is located in the Saint-Hubert borough of Longueuil, Quebec. The airport is located 16 km (9.9 mi) east of Downtown Montreal. [-Wikipedia]

The original plan was to establish a museum and Aerovision acquired a DC-3, Canso and Viscount.
The museum plans suffered a set back when the St Hubert air base was sold.
Fondation Aérovision Québec (FAQ) shifted its focus to the creation of a Quebec aviation hall of fame and the Viscount was sold to a college in Laval.
The DC-3 and Canso are still stored at St Hubert airport.
See how I found these aircraft on my US-Canada 2009 trip.

Here's how 2017 progress is made for another restoration effort:
C-FDTD Douglas DC-3 MSN 12253, Avialogs - Saint-Hubert, QC - CYHU - 20-05-2017. pierregillard.zenfolio.com/Phase 1 restoration - let's hope things work out here!

See also www.pierregillard.com/blog/


Convair without markings, inviting identification!
Convair CV580 N??? at Rickenbacker Airport (LCK),OH (05Mar2016).
Anyone with an idea of its identity & owner? N589X has been suggested as most likely candidate: EMAIL

I thought N584E to be a candidate (reported Opa Locka/KOPF 10Nov2010, all white and no titles), but that one was reported in 2011 as "On 11/03/2011 it left for Guadalajara, Mexico MMGL and was subsequently parked there still in an all white colour scheme. During January 2012 it was re-reg as XA-UPL and reportedly about to join the Airlink fleet."
N581P (c/n 29) was all white in 2014, but reportedly stored at Opa Locka.FL (2014 image).
Next I thought N582P a candidate, but I have that one as 'at Columbus-LCK 28Sep2007 minus tail'. Then I looked down at the next photo and there it is on this very page (repaired!).
And N585P? Can't be because Kenneth Meegan has it (here, a/w & stored in 2014) on Flickr and during the same visit had the unmarked also, here.

The AoC of Air Tahoma revoked in Jan.2009, after a CV580 crashed on a post-maintenance test flight (probably N587X 01Sep08 - see ASN report) and subsequent audit.
I ran out of 'stored @LCK' Convair on the ATDB.aero database... Anyone?
See below copied thread of Classic-Propliners where N589X was offered a candidate!

On Yahoo's Classic-Propliners forum a thread was started 07Feb17, with the following report posted and query by 'Bell47g3' (alias for Ken Swartz):
I photographed 8 Convair airframes in a fenced compound at LCK Rickenbacker International Airport, Ohio on 05Mar16. Assume most are ex-Air Tahoma.
I've managed to ID seven of the eight aircraft, three of which had no tails. Still need to identify the all white CV580 freighter parked between between N582P and N585P?

East Side of Compound
Convair CV580, N582P, intact, white with blue/red cheat line, engine cowlings, no props, (ex-RCAF)
Convair CV580, ????, intact, all white, engine cowlings, no props, parked between N582P and N585P
Convair CV580 N585P, intact, all white, engine cowlings, no props
Convair CV580 EC-GSJ, no US reg visible, DHL red/white c/s & titles, no engines, cowlings or rudder

West Side of Compound
Convair C-131A, N882P?, white/blue/red, on landing gear, but wings and tail cut off
Convair CV580, N73104, white with blue/grey cheat line, but wings and tail cut off (markings matched to photo)
Convair N13126, white with blue/grey cheat line, but wings and tail cut off
Convair VT-29B, N156PA, white/blue/red, on landing gear, but with outboard wings cut off and no rudder
..............................................................................................................................................................................................................
George Armstrong suggested on C-P: "The all white one I think is N589X, through a process of elimination. Mexico sale did not come to pass ('ntu'). Re-regd to N589X Inc, as N589X, date 19Jun14."
..............................................................................................................................................................................................................
Chris Trott posted:"N589X was supposed to be flown to Mexico as the spares aircraft for N584E and N588X (which became XA-UPL and XA-TRB)."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A little bit of history on N589X c/n 459 from my (RL/ webmaster) files
Ex/C-GGWF, dlvd to EAT/DHL 22Jan1988 reg'd OO-DHL; current in 1996.
Leased to Swiftair may00 as EC-HMS.
Ln NCE 10Dec01. Ln @A.net 27Dec03 DHL @BRU.
Rr 22Aug06 N589X (=Air Tahoma) N589X. Passed thru SNN 15Sep06.
Ln Rickenbacker,OH ..Sep06 in DHL c/s.
Reg canx 21Oct08, sold to Mexico XA-...
Reg N589X current on FAA's N-inquiry website, R19Jun14; no mention of exported. ./end.

 

CV580 N582P by Ken Swartz (2016)
Convair CV580 N582P (c/n 475; ex/CF-LMN -once ex/ RCAF) at Rickenbacker Airport (LCK),OH (05Mar2016)
I came across N582P in 2006 at Vancouver Int'l Airport, while being unloaded.

This aircraft was completed by Canadair as a CV540 with Napier Eland turboprops

The Electric Boat Company bought of Groton,CT bought Canadair Ltd. from the Canadian Government after the World War Two.
Electric Boat Company and Canadair became the nucleus around which General Dynamics Corp was formed in 1952.
General Dynamics owned Convair and Canadair.
When Convair cleared out the CV440 line in San Diego to build the CV880, the unsold CV440 and production tools and jigs were acquired by Canadair.
Three inherited Convair 440s became Canadair CL-66s (CV540s) and completed with 3,500 hp Napier Eland turboprop engines
These were CF-LMA, CF-LMN and CF-MKO …
These aircraft made extensive demo tours of North and South America and in Europe.
One was also flown experimentally by Allegheny Airlines.
And the two or three aircraft were later flown by Quebecair in 1961 and 1962.

The three early civil aircraft were returned to Canadair in 1962 or 1963 and then flown by the RCAF as serial 11161 (CF-LMN), 11162 (CF-LMA) and 11163 (CF-MKO)
CF-LMN and CF-MKO were sold to Allison, re-engined with 501s turboprops and sold to North Central Airlines.
The third, CF-LMA was sold to a broker, re-engined and sold to Avensa in Venezuela

The RCAF ordered 10 new CL-66s delivered with Napier Eland turboprop engines which were extremely unreliable.
Seven of the 10 new CL-66s were later re-engined with Allison 501s.
Two others 11155 and 11158 were used for spares and 11153 was destroyed during an oxygen fire during maintenance.
(One can find info & fate of these CL66s on my page dedicated to my visit to Saskatoon in 2007).

Information Source: Canadian Aircraft Since 1909 by K.M Molson and H.A. Taylor, Putnam, 1982

CV580 EC-GSJ by Ken Swartz (2016)
Convair CV580 (N??) EC-GSJ (ex/ C-GGWG) at Rickenbacker Airport (LCK),OH (05Mar2016)
Ken wrote: "This aircraft apparently received an N-number when it arrived in the US from Europe, but I
could not see it on the airframe. I first saw this aircraft when it was in service with Air Ontario."
A.Avrane: "EC-GSJ was reg'd N590X 14aug06 but never applied."

Convairs or scrap at LCK; by Ken Swartz (2016)
Convairs N73126 - N882P - N73104 at Rickenbacker Airport (LCK),OH (05Mar2016)

I have N73126 (CV580 c/n 63) as 'Ln Columbus, Ohio/Rickenbacker in various states of disrepair ..Sep03.'
And while it was reported also on 02Aug05 I have 'B/u aug09, reg canx 01Dec10.' Hmmm, not quite broken up.

N882P: a photo on Airliners.net + Flickr confirm the identity of this Convair C-131A Samaritan (240; c/n 53-23).
It is an ex/ USAF bird: 52-5803 and was reg'd 21may84 Condor Aviation of Spanaway,WA. In 2000 it was
reported operating for Air Tahoma, based here at LCK. On 19Sep04 already reported @LCK: no tailtip, no engines..
.
And N73104 is CV580 c/n 4, flew passengers (then CV340-31) with Renown Aviation. Ended up in 2000 with
Air Tahoma; noted @LCK in disrepair during Sep.2003, and I have it as 'B/u aug09 - reg canx 01Dec10.'
Well, almost but not quite.

Screendump (29Feb2017) of ATDB.aero depicting Air Tahoma's fleet:
Air Tahoma fleet -ATDB.aero
N588X (c/n 52) went to Air Tribe (XA-TRB) and N584E (24) was also listed by ATDB with Air Tribe (XA-UPL)
More on Air Tribe and its owner, Noel Rude, see further down this item.

George Armstrong supplied this helpful aerial look through Google Earth:
Air Tahoma fleet stored

I wondered how come N589X was reg'd in 2014 to (to N589X INC, but that was the signature of Air Tahoma’s operations) while Air Tahoma ceased operations in 2009.
Chris provided a likely explanation: "Air Tahoma closed, but not because of bankruptcy. The airplanes were all owned outright by the Rude family business(es), and Air Tahoma ran as debt free as possible anyway, so I’m sure that small amount of time between closing it and getting Air Tribe going wasn’t a big issue for them. I’m sure now the payment for storage of the remaining airframes is being paid from that operation anyway."

Googling I came across the Linked In page of Noel Rude: "Owner, Air Tahoma, Inc. - Air Tribe Arizona State University Columbus,OH, USA." Subitems: Owner Air Tribe sep. 2011 – present / Air Tahoma, Inc. may 1996 – present / Owner R&R Holdings jun. 1990 – present / Owner Cool Air jun. 1986 - President Flying Fireman sep. 1985 – present." That 'Arizona State University' is where he got part of his training (MBA 1984-85).

On a forum I found quoted: "Guadalajara, Mexico,- USMX AirLink (www.usmxairlink.com) announced today that it has formed Air Tribe; a new division dedicated to air cargo and specializing in ACMI and ad-hock [sic] regional cargo.
Air Tribe will start by offering small jet and large turbo prop solutions throughout Mexico and its surrounding neighbors.
Air Tribe will be headed by Noel Rude, a long time veteran of the aviation industry, with the stated goal of making Air Tribe the leading regional cargo carrier in Mexico.
Since 1994, USMX AirLink has built a global reputation for providing reliable cost effective air cargo services. Today, AirLink’s reputation as one of the industry’s most reliable ‘solutions providers’ with their own fleet, has earned the company a growing client base of international freight forwarders and logistic companies."
[Airlink Executive quotes several types of aircraft at its disposal: Hawker800XP, Citation III, Lear Jet 40XR, Lear Jet 25D, Beechjet 400A & Pilatus PC-12].

The link between Airlink and Air Tribe/N.Rude is probably the first invested in the latter. While Noel Rude is CEO of Air Tribe, one Jesus Hernandez is the CFO.
Mr Hernandez has his business, USMX Airlink, also reg'd in the USA: US-MX Airlink L.C. is a Nevada Domestic Limited-Liability Company filed on January 19, 1999. The company has 4 principals on record. .... Jessica Faubert from Carson City NV, Jesus Hernandez Campos from Carson City NV, Monica Faubert from Carson City NV, and Raymond H Faubert from Carson City NV. (A lot of 'Fauberts'..!)

From http://dev.worldpossible.org:81/wikipedia_en_all_2016-02/A/Air_Tahoma.html (only in part copied here):
Air Tahoma - wiki
Note that last sentence 'In 2011 Noel Rude resumed cargo operations under new company name Air
Tribe currently based in Guadalajara
, Mexico.'
ATDB lists as Air Tribe's entire current (Feb.2017) fleet:
XA-TRB (c/n 52, ex/ N588X) and XA-UPL (c/n 24, ex/ N584E).

 


Convair XA-UMI by Ken Swartz (2016)
Convair CV640(F/SCD) XA-UMI (c/n of T.S.M. (Aeronaves TSM) seen at Louisville,KY (SDF) on 28Feb016

A few notes from my (RL /webmaster) files:
Delivered new to Braniff in 1953 and N3417 went through various owners, ended up with Zantop Int'l Airlines, at Detroit-Willow Run,MI. By now a freighter, converted from CV340-32. Note the Rolls Royce Dart 542 engines.
Zantop ceased operations in 1997.
In Nov.1997 N3417 was reg'd to Century A/l, operated as C & M Airways (homebase El Paso,TX).
I have a report on 18Mar02 at El Paso,TX as probly stored. Again on 07Oct02 still at El Paso, reported all C&M CV640s stored/forsale and airworthy.
Similar reports on 20Feb04 'std El Paso' and 15Nov07 'std El Paso', same 29Jun08.
Then, as miracles do happen: sold to Aeronaves TSM, rr XA-??? by Frontera Flight Holdings 07Jul09 made official as reg'd 21Aug09 to XA-UMI.
XA-UMI seems in splendid working order!

Rolf Larsson sent me in Mar.2017 a photo of PH-CGD in Martinair livery, during the 1960s. It is another aircraft presently operating with Aeronaves, as XA URL. Photos by Friends & Guests (48).

 

Lockheed 18 N119J by Ken Swartz (2016)
Lockheed L18 N119J at Bowman Field,KY (KLOU/LOU) on 27Feb2016.

W.L Paris piloted this Lockheed L.18 N119J on its last flight into Bowman Field in Louisville, Kentucky on July 22, 1975.
The aircraft was originally a corporate aircraft owned by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft or United Technologies (?). W.L Paris is the general manager of Central American Airways FBO, a family owned business at Bowman Field.
N119J (c/n 18-2359) was stored by Casablanca Airlines.
The Lockheed has sat on the FBO ramp now for over 40 years!

DC-3 C-GRSB Warplane Heritage Museum; by Ken Swartz (2016)
Douglas C-47A (c/n 12295) C-GRSB, now owned by Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum (YMH, 19Mar2016)

A few notes from my (RL /webmaster) files:
C-GRSB was noted stored at an inactive airfield, FB Uplands (nr Ottawa) during the early-1990s.
'RSB went to Innotech Avtn/Canadian Center for Remote Sensing and reported at Ottawa in march 1997.
It was used for investigating the SWR111 MD11 crash in Sep.1998, though I have no details of what that would have entailed for this DC-3.
At some point it was donated by Environment Canada to Canadian Warplane Heritage; it is an actual D-day C-47!
It participated at Normandy as FZ947 (RAF) named 'Kwicherbichen'; in Sep.1947 it joined RCAF 437 Sqdn, later became 12945 CAF with no.424 Sqd @Trenton.
Probably ferried in 2014 to the museum.


Kenneth Swartz wrote me the following update (30Mar17):
"REF: Douglas C-47A (c/n 12295) C-GRSB, now owned by Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum (YMH, 19Mar2016)
The use of this C-47 as a government airborne research platform between ca.1985 and 2014 is not very well documented and it carried several colour schemes during its years of service.

After leaving RCAF service, this C-47 was first operated by the Department of Energy Mines and Resources as an airborne Remote Sensing platform (note "RS" in registration) alongside a Falcon 20 C-GRSD and a Convair 580
C-GRSC from an aircraft hangar located in the 'Uplands' area of the airport, on Hunt Club Road (which is now used by SGL, Sander Geophysics Ltd)
Department of Energy Mines and Resources previously flew a Short Skyvan CF-GSC (the registration refers to Geological Survey of Canada) and a Beech 65-B80 C-FWSG that were retired in the early 1980s (needs confirmation).
Innotech Aviation received a contract in the mid-1980s to manage the flight operations and maintenance of the Department of Energy Mines and Resources DC-3, Falcon and Convair fleet based in Ottawa, while Canadian government scientists continued to utilize these aircraft for their research work.
Canada was a pioneer in the airborne use of magnetometers to detect ore bodies. This gave rise to a large airborne geophysics industry which developed other airborne systems to detect mineral deposits, map vegetation, arctic ice flows and pollution such as oil spills.

I believe that Environment Canada absorbed the Department of Energy Mines and Resources in the mid-1990s which may have expanded the scope of the missions flown by the aircraft to include anti pollution patrols.
'Uplands' refers to north end of Ottawa's MacDonald Cartier International Airport, which was established by the Ottawa Flying Club (which has been in continuous operation since 1928) and became part of the RCAF Uplands air force training base during the Second World War.
The current Ottawa airport terminal and longer runways were built a couple kilometers to the south of the original Uplands area of Ottawa the airport, but the two parts are connected by a taxiway."

 


 

Ken Swartz wrote me and sent this photo of Canso C-FPQK, taken early 03Apr2017 at Montreal-St. Hubért:
"Canso C-FPQK is being dismantled at RCAF base at St Hubert, by same guy who dismantled & moved the Vickers Viscount to Laval, btw."
Canso C-FPQK by Ken Swartz april 2017
C-FPQK is being disassembled for transport south, to the USA, for the Collings Foundation.
More on its history can be read on my page USA-Canada 2009, which was regularly updated.


 

This update was added 09Apr2017

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz

Ken wrote me late March 2017: "Just returned from my 5.000 km road trip to Texas and Louisiana in search of helicopters and propliners. Lots as helicopters but not as many piston or turboprops as I would have liked to see!
Here is a selection of props from Barksdale AFB, Abbevile and Houma,LA."
(Note from websmaster: I made a selection of the images sent to me)

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz
Beech AT-11 'Kansan' N3983C '232' (c/n 3267)
Former US Air Force AT-11 (42-36887) is now preserved with the Eigth Air Force Museum

The Global Power Museum is located at Barksdale Air Force Base and is a major national repository of historic Air Force airplanes.
It is free and open to the public, accessible via the Barksdale AFB north gate. (This may not be applicable to non-US residents /- Webmaster)
It was formerly known as the 8th Air Force Museum until 2012.
The facility features a series of indoor exhibits and displays, and an outdoor airpark of restored, historic aircraft and related equipment. The airpark also includes numerous sculptures and monuments to various individuals and groups of the Eighth Air Force.
It is one of nearly twenty official field units of the Museum of the United States Air Force located at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio.

Dedicated in 1979, the Barksdale Global Power Museum hosts 50,000 visitors annually. It is located at 88 Shreveport Road, in Bossier City, accessible via the North Gate Road.
www.airplaneexhibits.com/barksdale-global-power-museum.htm

 

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz
Douglas C-47A Skytrain 'Hi Honey' 43-16130; preserved at the Barksdale AFB airpark, Bossier City

'This C-47A is on loan from the NMUSAF. It was flown for a short time in the Army Airforces and then flown to Spain under the Lend-Lease Agreement. It was returned to the USA and purchased as surplus in the 1970s.
This Skytrain was flown to the 8th AF Museum in 1983.
It is displayed as a C-47A of the 315th Troop Carrier Group, which was one of three Troop Carrier Groups assigned to the Eighth Air Force in 1942.' (Copied from a sign posted with this C-47A)

From www.airport-data.com/aircraft/43-16130: 'To civil registry as N86453, then T.3-33 with Spanish Air Force.
Registered G-BGCF 20Nov1978 then N3753C Apr 1980.
In 1987 preserved at 8th Air Force Museum, Barksdale AFB, LA although nominally on charge of USAFM.'

And from www.aerialvisuals.ca some add'l details: 'Ca. 1943 United States Army Air Force with s/n 43-16130.
To unknown owner with reg'd N86453.
Taken on Strength/Charge with the Ejercito de Aire with s/n T.3-33.
1978 to unknown owner reg'd G-BGCF.
11Apr1980 to West Air International, Monument, CO reg'd N3753C.
05May1983 Civil registration N3753C cancelled.' Rest as above.

 

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz
Boeing KC-97 0-30240
Joe Baugher USAF Serials 1953: '240 (msn 17022) to MASDC 07Jun1966. Returned to service Apr 6, 1970.
Now on display at 8th Air Force Museum, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana.'

After WWII Boeing developed the Model 367, a military transport airplane based on the B-29 Superfortress bomber. Its civilian counterpart was the Model 377 Stratocruiser.
The C-97 Stratofreighter had a double-lobe fuselage consisting of two intersecting circular sections, so that the 74-foot-long upper deck had a larger diameter. Cargo was loaded through large clamshell-type doors in the belly of the aircraft using a built-in ramp and a hoist.
Its wings, engine gear and other parts were similar to the B-29.

The C-97 was designated KC-97 when it was equipped with the Boeing-designed flying boom for aerial refueling -- the boom had controls so the boom operator could literally "fly" the end of the boom from the KC-97 aerial tanker into the receiving airplane.
There were 888 C-97s built between 1947 and 1958. Of those, 219 were adapted as KC-97E and F tankers and 592 were KC-97G models.
The KC-97Gs had additional 700-gallon external fuel tanks under each wing and could dispense 8.513 gallons of fuel while carrying 96 troops.
To keep its tankers compatible with its newer high performance jet aircraft, the USAF gradually replaced the slower KC-97 planes with Boeing KC-135 jet tankers after 1956.
From: www.b29-superfortress.com/c97-stratofreighter.htm

 

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz
Boeing B-29 487627/BF-617
A total of 3.970 B-29 Superfortress aircraft were built during production at 4 assembly plants during WWII.
Yet only about 22 complete B-29 airframes have survived and are on display in the United States, including
the B-29 here at Barksdale.

The Superfort was delivered as a B-29A during WWII, but served the war effort as a TB-29 trainer.
After the war, the B-29 was stationed in England, where it was used to drop agents behind the iron curtain.
The B-29 was reported to have been lost on several occasions. The B-29 was eventually retired to the US Army Aberdeen Proving Grounds, where it was in storage to be used as a gunnery target.
The B-29 was rescued by the museum before it could be destroyed.
From: www.johnweeks.com/b29/b29shreve.html

 

Barksdale AFB, preservation line up; by Ken Swartz
In honour of 303rd Bombardment Group (H), Molesworth, England - WWII

Nearly 13.000 Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers were produced as part of the massive World War II military build-up.
It became one of the most famous, and successful, airplanes ever built.
Today, a total of only 39 surviving B-17 airframes are located in the U.S., including the B-17G 'Miss Liberty' restored and on display here.

The website www.warbirdregistry.org/b17registry/b17-4483884 has the folowing history on the B-17:
Msn 32525, built for USAAF as 44-83884
Delivered to US Navy as Bu. 77244
- BOC: July 25, 1945
- SOC: July 10, 1956
American Compressed Steel Corp., Dallas, TX, December 2, 1957-1960
- Registration N6471D reserved but not issued, December 1957
- Registered as N5230V
- Stored unconverted, marked as XD-10, Dallas-Love, 1958-1961
Marson Equipment & Salvage Co, Tucson, AZ, October 18, 1960-61
Aero Union Corp, Chico, CA, September 27, 1961-1979
- Flew as tanker #C19, #E19 & #19
8th AF Museum, Barksdale AFB, LA, 1980-2013
- Initially displayed as 338289/Yankee Doodle II
- Later displayed as 483884/Yankee Doodle II

 



These PV-2's Ken found at Abbeville in March 2017 and are a bit rare on the internet I found; finally, through www.oldprops.ukhome.net I concluded them to be N6857C (15-1216) and N6853C (15-1125) resp.

Lockheed PV-2s at Abbeville
PV-2 Harpoon N6857C at Abbeville Airport
This PV-2 Harpoon N6857C (c/n 15-1216) has its history described on www.aerialvisuals.ca

From the above link I quote a few remarks as it has quite a history and two decades ago still flew as a warbird..

1944 Taken on Strength/Charge with the United States Navy with BuNo 37250
1954-1957 Assigned to AS Litchfield Park, AZ for storage
28Mar57 To Ralph Wingfield, Nogales, AZ reg'd N6857C
Various woners: Ben Whitney Trading Co, Calexico, CA - Max L. Biegert, Phoenix, AZ - Riverside Aircraft Co, CA - Rosenbalm Aviation,OR
August 1965 Converted for use as a bait spreader
08Jan1966 - 1976 To Dothan Aviation Corp, Dothan, AL
April 1966 Converted for use as a swathemaster spreader
01Mar79 To Hugh W. Wheelless, Dothan,AL
Ca, 1979 Used for liquid spraying grasshopper control in Oregon
1980 to 1990 Withdrawn from use and placed in open storage at Mesa,AZ
Reg'd to various owners during that time
02Nov90 - 1998 To Combat Aircraft Museum/Richard T. Mitchell, Lafayette,LA
05Nov90 Ferry flight. Moved from Mesa to Broussard, LA, for restoration. Restored, Markings 'Fat Cat Too'
04Oct1991 Certificate of airworthiness for NL6857C (PV-2, 15-1216) issued. That same month first flight.

30 September 1994 Crashed.
The accident occurred at the Lafayette Regional Airport (LFT) Lafayette, LA, United States while landing. The damage was substantial.
The right seat pilot was instructing the pilot in the left seat for a type rating in the airplane. After the second landing, the pilot in command in the right seat was configuring the airplane for takeoff and inadvertently pulled the gear handle up instead of the flaps...
The pilot also reported that the two handles are identical in size, shape and color.

 

The PV-2 Harpoon was the most specialized and successful of Lockheed’s World War II bombers.
Whereas the Hudson and Ventura had been adapted from airliners in ways that impaired their operational effectiveness, the Harpoon — though still based on the Model 18 airliner — was redesigned to the specifications of a single customer, the U.S. Navy, with larger wings and tail surfaces, greater fuel capacity, and weapons capabilities optimized to the Navy’s needs.

After the war, the Harpoon found favor with civilian spraying operators, and most — possibly all — of the 25 or so aircraft that survive today served in this capacity.
Of the survivors, 3 or 4 are airworthy and restored to military configuration, a few are static displays in museums such as the National Naval Aviation Museum, American Airpower Heritage Museum and Pima Air Museum, and the rest are scattered around airports in the U.S., still in unrestored spraying configuration and awaiting the attentions of restorers.
From: http://aircraft-in-focus.com/lockheed-pv-2-harpoon/

 

Lockheed PV-2s at Abbeville
Lockheed PV-2s at Abbeville, N6853C (c/n 15-1125), a former sprayer and firebomber.
Part ('projects') of Louisiana Military Hall of Fame & Museum (website) here at Chris Crusta Memorial Airport.

Its history I found on www.aerialvisuals.ca of which I quote a few facts here:
'United States Navy with BuNo 37159, declared surplus at NAS North Island, CA in 1957
1963 Modified for agricultural spraying
26Apr 1963 Certificate of Airworthiness for NR6853C (PV-2, 151125) issued
1967-1979 To D and D Aerial Spraying, Rantoul, KS
Oct1979 To Bruce R. Kinney, Richey, MT. Used for grasshopper control in North Dakota and Oregon
04Feb1981 To Central Air Service/D and D Aerial Spraying, Rantoul,KS
03Dec1985 - 1987 To Central Air Service/Bill Dempsay, Rantoul,KS.
1985 to ca.1986 Converted to a fire bomber and operated as tanker #176
1986 Leased to Teskes Aviation, Twin Falls, ID
03Jun1987 To Kinney Air Tankers/Bruce R. Kinney, Richey, MT
-various owners-
(ca.) 1993 to 1998 To Combat Aircraft Museum/Richard T. Mitchell, Lafayette,LA
By 1998 On behalf of the owner stored with/at Lafayette Regional, Lafayette, LA

Lodestar at Abbeville
Lockheed PV-2 N6853C (c/n 15-1125) at Abbeville - Chris Crusta Mem'l Airport

The Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar is a passenger transport aircraft of the World War II era.
Sales of the 10–14 passenger Lockheed Model 14 Super Electra, which first flew in 1937, had proved disappointing, despite the aircraft's excellent performance, as it was more expensive to operate than the larger Douglas DC-3, already in widespread use.

In order to improve the type's economics, Lockheed decided to stretch the aircraft's fuselage by 5 feet 6 inches (1.68 m), allowing an extra two rows of seats to be fitted.
The prototype for the revised airliner, designated Model 18 by Lockheed, was converted from the fourth Model 14, one of a batch which had been returned to the manufacturer by Northwest Airlines after a series of crashes.
The modified aircraft first flew in this form on 21Sep1939.
A total of 625 Lodestars of all variants were built.

When the United States started to build up its military air strength in 1940–41, many American-operated Lodestars were impressed as the C-56.

The Lockheed Ventura is a twin engine medium bomber of World War II, used by United States and British Commonwealth forces in several guises, including maritime patrol.
The Ventura was developed from the Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar transport, as a replacement for the Lockheed Hudson bombers then in service with the Royal Air Force.
Used in daylight attacks against occupied Europe, they proved to have weaknesses and were removed from bomber duty and some used for patrols by Coastal Command. The US Navy ordered a revised design which entered service as the Harpoon for anti-submarine work.

The PV-2 Harpoon was a major redesign of the Ventura with the wing area increased giving an increased load-carrying capability; first flown on 03Dec1943.
On the PV-2, the armament became standardized at five forward-firing machine guns. Many early PV-1s had a bombardier's position, which was deleted in the PV-2.
By the end of 1944, only 69 PV-2s had been delivered. They finally resumed when the redesign was complete. The first aircraft shipped were the PV-2D, which had 8 forward-firing machine guns and was used in ground attacks. When World War II ended, all of the order was cancelled.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Model_18_Lodestar
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Ventura

 


 

Early april 2017 Ken wrote me: "I photographed the CV580 at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum on the weekend."

CV580 C-GRSC
Convair CV580 C-GRSC c/n 72 at Canada Aviation and Space Museum (01/02Apr2017)

From my (RL) files: 'C-GRSC. Government/Dept of Energy, Mines & Resources; converted CV340-31.
Reported @Ottawa Mar97. At one time operated as CF-BGY, last noted 09Sep71 London-LGW.
Ln Ottawa IAP 02Sep03 'Environment Canada'. Same 18Apr04.'

From Air-Britain's 'The Convailiners Story' (1997):
CV340-31 c/n 72 N73134 United Airlines 'Portland' M15Apr53 D15May53; N400J Johnson & Johnson B26Nov58; cvtd CV580 (PAC26) D14Oct63; CF-BGY Great Lakes Paper Co, Thunder Bay,ONT B26Mar70; N8EG Sav A Stop Inc Jan73; Omni INvestment Corp 1974 (cx 12Jul74); C-GRSC Dept of Energy Mines & Resources, Montreal,QUE D27Jun75; Innotech Ltd (remote sensing).

From the website of Canada Aviation and Space Museum:
"After helping to precisely map much of Canada through radar remote sensing for decades, the Government of Canada’s long-serving Convair 580 C-GRSC joint the Canada Aviation and Space Museum’s collection.
The storied aircraft landed at Rockcliffe Airport neighbouring the Museum 24Jun2015, carrying a precious cargo of scientific equipment.
The Convair 580’s radar remote sensing equipment contributed to gaining a better understanding of the Canadian landscape and seascape, and yielded great benefits to sectors as diverse as forestry, agriculture, geology, hydrology, oceanography, ice studies, environmental protection, cartography, oil and gas operations, mineral exploration, and arctic navigation.
Originally used as an executive transport aircraft by the Johnson & Johnson company in the 1950s, from 1974 until 2012 it served as an experimental radar remote sensing platform for various Government of Canada departments and agencies, such as Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, and the National Research Council of Canada. The rugged aircraft flew diverse research missions in Canada’s High Arctic as well as for the European Space Agency."

 

 

Ken also sent me these images of a visit to Houma,LA in march 2017.

N932H at Houma, by Ken Swartz
C-47B-DK N932H (c/n 34368/17101) at Houma, by Ken Swartz; note the sprayer installation!
N932H was acquired 10May06 Basler Turbo Conversions and subsequently converted. Prior to that it had operated
for Hoganair (a.o., as N90HA) before going to Miami Valley Aviation (reg'd N932H; ofMiddletown,OH).
Reg'd 22Jul09 to Airborne Support Inc. of Houma,LA & ferried from OSH-Goderich on 15May09.

N64766 at Houma, by Ken Swartz
N64766 (c/n 27218/15773) at Houma, march 2017
This is ex C-47B Canadian AF 12910 and I came across it as N64766 for 'Environmental Air Services' also at
Houma (see my Deep South report with a detailed history).

N64767 at Houma
Douglas C-47A N64767 (c/n 10199) at Houma, also here the sprayer installation clearly to be seen.
My Deep South report has a detailed history.

DC-4 N67024 at Houma, by Ken Swartz
DC-4 (actually C-54D) N67024 (c/n 10550, line nbr 281) of Airborne Support at Houma (LA), by Ken Swartz.
And also for N67024 one can find a detailed report when I came across in whilst travelling in these parts!

DC-4 forward fuselage at Houma,LA - identity?
No doubt this forward fuselage here at Houma was acquired for parts, but which DC-4 is it; the reply is below.
Is it an ex/ Mesa Falcon Field (Phoenix, Arizona) bird..? Well, that was the start of my sleuthing...

Here's a 20Jul2016 pic: www.flickr.com/ - perhaps we can create a timeline that may be of help.

My money is on N67019 and here is how I came to that conclusion.
On my Mesa-Falcon 2008 report I received an update by Bill Reid and 'cadet77' (on Photos by Friends & Guests 37) showing how N67017 and N67019 (both previously owned by Roger Brooks of Fairbanks,AK but he closed his business) were hauled away.
I had come across both of them at Greybull,WY (my report) in 2014 and once again it is evident that N67019
is the one without the forward fuselage.
Photos on JetPhotos.com (2012 and 2005) & Flickr.com show it just has to be N67019 here!

The scrapping & move at Mesa-Falcon Field was in 2013 and 1st noted (afaik) in 2016, hauled in that time span.


N67019 9% most likely candidate of forward fuselage found at Houma 2016.
Photo by Stephen Toernblom on JetPhotos.com

 

Ken Swartz sent me this brilliant photo of Grumman HU-16 N7025J in this flamboyant ITPS livery
HU-16 N7025J
N7025J was reg'd 19Apr2017 to Sky West Aviation Inc (Trustee).
www.itpscanada.com

 

 

 

 

 

 


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