ISTANBUL: tourist sights
-nov. 2012-

ALL PHOTOS © RUUD LEEUW

 

 
Old houses of Istanbul
The Fatih Mosque (Turkish: 'Fatih Camii') or Conqueror's Mosque in English) is an Ottoman imperial mosque located in the Fatih district of Istanbul, Turkey. It was one of the largest examples of Turkish-Islamic architecture in Istanbul and represented an important stage in the development of classic Turkish architecture. It is named after Fatih Sultan Mehmed, the Ottoman sultan who captured Constantinople in 1453.
WIKIPEDIA
 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, mosques
 


 

Istanbul, mosques

Istanbul 11-2012, mosques
 

 

Istanbul 11-2012
Don't remember the name on the Bosphorus of this palace (?).
 

 

Istanbul 11-2012
The Archeological Museum appeared to be hugely fascinating!

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum

The Alexander Sarcophagus is a late 4th century BC Hellenistic stone sarcophagus adorned with bas-relief carvings of Alexander the Great.
The work is remarkably well preserved and has been celebrated for its high aesthetic achievement. It is considered the outstanding holding of the Istanbul Archaeology Museum.

WIKIPEDIA, more..

 

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum

 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, archeoligocal museum
 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Hagia Sophia is a former Orthodox patriarchal basilica, later a mosque, and now a museum.
From the date of its dedication in 360 until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarchate of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire.
The building was a mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931, when it was secularized.
Famous in particular for its massive dome, it is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture and is said to have 'changed the history of architecture'.

In 1453, Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman Turks under Sultan Mehmed II, who subsequently ordered the building converted into a mosque.
The bells, altar, iconostasis, and sacrificial vessels were removed and many of the mosaics were plastered over.
Islamic features – such as the mihrab, minbar, and four minarets – were added while in the possession of the Ottomans.
It remained a mosque until 1931 when it was closed to the public for four years.
It was re-opened in 1935 as a museum by the Republic of Turkey.

WIKIPEDIA, more..

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

Istanbul 11-2012, Hagia Sofia

 

 

Istanbul 11-2012
 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Basilica Cisterne

The Basilica Cistern (Turkish: Yerebatan Sarayı - 'Sunken Palace', or Yerebatan Sarnıcı - 'Sunken Cistern'), is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul (formerly Constantinople).

The cistern, located 500 feet (150 m) southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I.

WIKIPEDIA, more..

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Basilica Cisterne

Istanbul 11-2012, Basilica Cisterne

 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar
The Egyptian Bazaar, a.k.a. the Spice Bazaar.

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar

 

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Spice Bazar
Sultan Ahmed Mosque a.k.a. the Blue Mosque.

Istanbul 11-2012, Blue Mosque

Istanbul 11-2012, Blue Mosque

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is an historical mosque in Istanbul. The mosque is popularly known as the Blue Mosque for the blue tiles adorning the walls of its interior.

It was built from 1609 to 1616, during the rule of Ahmed I. Like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasah and a hospice.
While still used as a mosque, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque has also become a popular tourist attraction.

WIKIPEDIA, more..

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Blue Mosque

Istanbul 11-2012, Blue Mosque

 

 

Topkapı Palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace
Circumcision Room - Summer Pavilion. This summer pavilion was built by Sultan Ibrahim in 1640. As this place
was used for the circumcision ceremonies of the crown princes, it is also called the Circumcision Room.
The walls are covered with the rare specimens of Ottoman tiles. The most important of these are the blue
and white tiles influenced by Far-eastern ceramics on the chamber facade dated 1529.

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Revan Kiosk- this pavilion was built in 1635 - 36, to commemorate the Revan Campaign and victory of Murad IV.
It is also called the Sarik Odasi, the Chamber of Turbans, as the turbans worn by the sultans were kept here.

With its colored marble decorations and tiles dating to the 17th century, this pavilion isone of the last examples of the classical Ottoman architecture.
The building was used as the Library of the Privy Chamber after 1733 with the donations of Sultan Mahmud I.

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

The Topkapı Palace was the primary residence of the Ottoman Sultans for approximately 400 years (1465-1856) of their 624-year reign.

As well as a royal residence, the palace was a setting for state occasions and royal entertainments. It is now a major tourist attraction and contains important holy relics of the Muslim world, including Muhammed's cloak and sword.

Construction began in 1459, ordered by Sultan Mehmed II, the conqueror of Byzantine Constantinople.
The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. At its peak, the palace was home to as many as 4,000 people, and covered a large area with a long shoreline.
The complex was expanded over the centuries, with major renovations after the 1509 earthquake and the 1665 fire. The palace contained mosques, a hospital, bakeries, and a mint.

From the end of the 17th century the Topkapı Palace gradually lost its importance as the Sultans preferred to spend more time in their new palaces along the Bosporus.
WIKIPEDIA, more..

 

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

The Imperial Harem (Harem-i Hümayûn) occupied one of the sections of the private apartments of the sultan; it contained more than 400 rooms.
The harem was home to the sultan's mother, the Valide Sultan; the concubines and wives of the sultan; and the rest of his family, including children; and their servants.
The harem consists of a series of buildings and structures, connected through hallways and courtyards. Every service team and hierarchical group residing in the harem had its own living space clustered around a courtyard. The number of rooms is not determined, with probably over 100, of which only a few are open to the public.

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

Istanbul 11-2012, Topkapi palace

 

HERE ARE MORE OF MY PAGES ON ISTANBUL:
MAIN PAGE
THE STREETS
THE WATERFRONT
THE OLD HOUSES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Created: 22dec12 - Updated: 24 December, 2012