OXFORD, ENGLAND
=Sep. 2013=

Photos © Ruud Leeuw

Oxford I have to consider as my favourity town in England. By happenstance I became friends with someone in the 1970s who lived not far from Oxford. Upon the regular visits there was always a day for Oxford. And when they moved away, Oxford remained in the picture.
The tv series 'Morse', 'Lewis' and 'Endeavour' all played in and around Oxford. These excellent British crime dramas reminded us it was time for a revisit.
 

Oxford, England
Little lanes such as these should be able to speak for they have much history to share.
The name obviously refers to a pub, but we were on our way to the Pitt Rivers Museum!

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum
It was probably as long ago as the late-1980s or early-1990s that I had visited this museum, but I always wanted
to return as the collection is so versatile it needs numerous revisits to take it all in.

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum

I was pleased to find mention of this museum in Bill Bryson's book 'The Road to Little Dribbling'.-
".. is packed beautifully and practically to the ceiling, with the most wonderful array of ethnographic objects, all soothingly lit and artistically arrayed."
"The museum is named for Augustus Henry Lane Fox Pitt Rivers, a wealthy landowner who was also one of the nastiest, most mean-spirited men in history. He beat his children, including his grown daughters, and mistreated his estate workers. Once he evicted a couple in their eighties from an estate cottage even though he knew they had nowhere to go, then left the cottage permanently empty. When he learned that his wife had arranged a Christmas party for the local villagers, he padlocked all the estate gates so that they couldn't get in. But he was a considerable scholar and amassed a notable collection of treasures, which he passed on to Oxford University. The result today is one of the great anthropological museums in the world."

Btw, this seems to be the 'official version':
The museum was founded in 1884 by Lt-General Augustus Pitt Rivers, who donated his collection to the University of Oxford with the condition that a permanent lecturer in anthropology must be appointed.
Museum staff are involved in teaching Archaeology and Anthropology at the University even today.
A second stipulation in the Deed of Gift was that a building should be provided to house the collection and used for no other purpose. The University therefore engaged Thomas Manly Deane, son of Thomas Newenham Deane who, together with Benjamin Woodward, had designed and built the original Oxford University Museum of Natural History building three decades earlier, to create an adjoining building at the rear of the main building to house the collection. Construction started in 1885 and was completed in 1886.

 

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum

The Pitt Rivers Museum is a museum displaying the archaeological and anthropological collections of the University of Oxford in Oxford, England.
The museum is located to the east of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, and can normally only be accessed through that building, but since that museum was closed (alas!) due to renovations, an independent entrance was created.

 

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum
The original donation consisted of approximately 22,000 items; this has now grown to a wopping 500,000 items!
Many of these have been donated by travellers, scholars and missionaries. [Wikipedia, more..]

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum

Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum
Pitt Rivers Museum website

 


 

Oxford, England
What could be more British than the pub!
This is the White Horse pub, next to Blackwell's bookshop on Broad Street. It was also a 'Morse hangout'.

This seems a good time to consider Oxford's streetmap:
Oxford, England
The many brownish markings are the Colleges of Oxford University, we'll have a look at some of them here.

Oxford, England
We were fortunate to have arrived at Open Doors Weekend, which allowed
entrance to several of the Colleges (at least past the gate and into the grounds).

Oxford, England

Oxford, England
Wadham College happened to be closed but I was allowed a look past the gate.

Wadham college was founded in 1610 by Dorothy Wadham, according to the will of her late husband Nicholas Wadham, a member of an ancient Somerset family.
The central buildings, a notable example of Jacobean architecture, were designed by the architect William Arnold and erected between 1610 and 1613. They include a large and ornate Hall, the largest amongst Oxford colleges after Christ Church and New College. [Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England
The famous bridge in New College Lane: 'Bridge of Sighs'. It connects to Hertford College (right).
It is a unique backdrop which features in a number of the (Inspector) Morse, Lewis and Endeavour episodes.

Oxford, England
Keep following the winding lanes and you'll end up at a College: not surprisingly (walking on New College Lane) we
arrive here at New College.

Oxford, England

New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. The full name of the college is The Warden and Scholars of St Mary's College of Winchester in Oxford. The College's official name, College of St Mary, is the same as that of the older Oriel College; hence, it has been referred to as the "New College of St Mary" and is now almost always called 'New College'.

The College is one of the main choral foundations of the University of Oxford. The College Choir has recorded over one hundred albums.

Despite its name, New College is one of the oldest of the Oxford colleges: it was founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, as "The College of St Mary of Winchester in Oxford", the second college in Oxford to be dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. [Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England

Oxford, England
The Cloisters and the Chapel are of particular note. Renowned for its grand interior, some of the stained glass windows
were designed by the 18th-century portraitist Sir Joshua Reynolds and contains works by Sir Jacob Epstein and El Greco.

Oxford, England


 

Oxford, England
St Edmund Hall

Oxford, England

St Edmund Hall (commonly referred to by its nickname of 'Teddy Hall') is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. The college has a claim to be 'the oldest academical society for the education of undergraduates in any university'.

The college is located just off Queen's Lane, near the High Street, in central Oxford; it has a reputation for being a friendly college with a wide range of extra-curricular strengths in areas such as creative writing, drama, sport and music.

Like the University of Oxford itself, the precise date of establishment of St Edmund Hall is not certain; it is usually estimated at 1236, before any other college was formally established. It is named after St Edmund of Abingdon, Oxfordshire, the first known Oxford Master of Arts and the first Oxford-educated Archbishop of Canterbury, who lived and taught on the college site. [Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England

Oxford, England
Tombstones recycled for use as steps.

Oxford, England
James Sadler, the first English aeronaut.

Oxford, England
These Colleges all have produced famous names: politicians, writers, artists, etc. Perhaps these boys will be famous too?

Oxford, England - Home of Inspector Lewis
Lunch at the Cafe Loco; look at who has been here too.

Oxford, England
Alas, Brasenose College remained off limits for us.

 

Oxford, England
Balliol College, our visit coinciding with their 750th (!) anniversary.

Oxford, England
'Fellows Bicycles Only'.

Oxford, England

Balliol College was founded in 1263.
Among the college's alumni are 3 former prime ministers (H. H. Asquith, who once described Balliol men as possessing 'the tranquil consciousness of an effortless superiority', Harold Macmillan, and Edward Heath), 5 Nobel laureates, and a number of literary figures and philosophers.
Moral philosopher Adam Smith is perhaps the best known alumnus of the college. [Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England
The oldest parts of the college are the north and west ranges of the front quadrangle, dated to 1431,
respectively the medieval hall, west side, now the 'new library' and the 'old library' first floor north side.
The ground floor is the 'Old' (i.e. Senior) Common Room.
This means that Balliol's 2nd library pre-dates the publication of printed books in Europe!

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

 

Oxford, England - Covered Market
Covered Market

Oxford, England

 

 

Oxford, England
Nuffield College.

Oxford, England
From its inception, Nuffield College initiated a number of trends at both Oxford and Cambridge.
It was the first college to have both women and men housed together. It was also the first college to consist solely
of graduate students. In addition, it was the first in modern times to have a defined subject focus, namely, the social sciences.

Oxford, England
I was allowed to take a photo of the Concierge Station, but only after certain items had been
removed from view and the window had been closed.

Oxford, England
Quite a modern hall.

 

Oxford, England - Christ Church College
Christ Church College & Cathedral

Oxford, England - Christ Church College

Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house (ædēs) of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England.
As well as being a college, Christ Church is also the cathedral church of the diocese of Oxford, namely Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford.

Like its sister college, Trinity College, Cambridge, it was traditionally considered the most aristocratic college of its university.

The college has admitted women as junior members since 1978, with the first female undergraduates matriculating in 1980.
[Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England - Christ Church College

Oxford, England - Christ Church College

Oxford, England - Christ Church College

Oxford, England - Christ Church College
Christ Church Cathedral is the cathedral of the diocese of Oxford, which consists of the counties of Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire. It is also, uniquely, the chapel of Christ Church College.
[Wikipedia]

Oxford, England - Christ Church College
John Locke (b.29Aug1632 – d.28Oct1704), widely known as the Father of Classical Liberalism, was an
English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers.

Locke's theory of mind is often cited as the origin of modern conceptions of identity and the self, figuring
prominently in the work of later philosophers such as Hume, Rousseau and Kant. Locke was the first to define
the self through a continuity of consciousness. He postulated that the mind was a blank slate or tabula rasa.

 

Oxford, England - Christ Church College

 

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

St Aldate's is a Church of England parish church in the centre of Oxford, in the Deanery and Diocese of Oxford.
The church is on the street named St Aldate's, opposite Christ Church and next door to Pembroke College.
The site has been used for Christian worship dating back to the Saxon era (the period of the history of the part of Great Britain that became known as England, lasting from Sub-Roman Britain following the end of Roman occupation, with the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century, until the Norman conquest of England in 1066 by William the Conqueror).
The church had been completely renovated with a very modern interior, what a pity!)


 

Oxford, England - Lincoln College
Lincoln College

Oxford, England
Lincoln College, or offcially: The College of the Blessed Mary and All Saints, Lincoln.
It was founded in 1427 by Richard Fleming, then Bishop of Lincoln. It is the 9th oldest of Oxford University's colleges.

A number of notable alumni have attended Lincoln College including John Radcliffe, Howard Florey, Nevil Sidgwick,
John Wesley, John le Carré and Dr. Seuss.

 

Oxford, England

Oxford, England
The college chapel was built in late perpendicular style between 1629 and 1631; its windows are enamelled rather than
stained, which is a process of painting the windows then firing them, a complicated procedure.
They are the work of Abraham van Linge, who was an expert in this technique. [Wikipedia]

 

Oxford, England - Exeter College
-

Oxford, England
Exeter College is located on Turl Street, where it was originally founded in 1314 by Devon-born Walter de Stapeldon,
Bishop of Exeter, as a school to educate clergymen.
From its foundation Exeter was popular with the sons of the Devonshire gentry and has been associated with
a number of notable people, including the novelist J.R.R. Tolkien.

Oxford, England - Exeter College
The chapel was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and constructed in 1854-60,
which was heavily inspired by the Sainte Chapelle in Paris.

Oxford, England
We were treated on some a capella singing, which had an entralling quality in this church.

Oxford, England
The Radcliffe Camera, which features as a backdrop in almost every episode of the Inspector Morse (et all) series.
Seen from the Fellows' Garden of Exeter College.

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

2
The University of Oxford (informally referred to as Oxford University or simply Oxford) is a
collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096,
making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world, and the second-oldest surviving university
in the world, after the University of Bologna.
It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris.
After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge,
where they established what became the University of Cambridge. [Wikipedia]

 

 

Oxford, England
We had to visit one more Inspector Morse hangout: the bar of the Randolph.

Oxford, England
The center photo has Colin Dexter, author of the Inspector Morse novels, raising his glass.
The photo on the left has Inspector Morse with his sidekick Detective Sergeant Lewis (he became the main character
in the Inspector Lewis tv series, after John Thaw had died). John Thaw as Chief Inspector Morse on the right.
That photo on the left also has Sir John Gielgud portrayed, which must have been the 1993 episode 'Twilight of the Gods'.

 

No report on Oxford would be complete without mentioning the many statues, gargoyles and grotesques!
These too often appear in the tv crime drames I have mentioned.
You may enjoy this external link: The Oxford Gargoyle Range

ngl1
These are very well known, you'll find them in Broad Street, across the road from Blackwell's Bookshop.

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

Oxford, England

 

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