SCOTLAND
In the footsteps of Mary, Queen of Scots
-JUNE 2011-

ALL PHOTOS © RUUD LEEUW

 

 

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We arrived by Seaways ferry at Newscastle, a city which has Scottish connotations in my mind but is in fact
still in England. So we headed north(-west). This was going to be my first trip to Scotland by car!

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The weather was excellent, sunny with a firm breeze blowing. Thus we arrived at the border!

 

We had a theme for this trip: in the footsteps of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots! And while we would adress other interests as well, our visit to Jedburgh was definitely all about Mary Stuart since here is a museum devoted to Marie Stuart (it opened in 1987, on the 400th anniversary of her death).
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Mary, Queen of Scots' House is a museum in Jedburgh devoted to Marie Stuart (it opened in 1987, on the 400th anniversary of her death).
Although there is some debate as to whether this was indeed the fortified house she was taken to, it is believed that she stayed here, where she was gravely ill after riding 30 miles to Hermitage and back in one day to visit James Hepburn, the Earl of Bothwell who was himself seriously wounded, and falling into a bog on the way home...
http://www.marie-stuart.co.uk/Castles/MaryHouse.htm

 

The rooms in Mary Queen of Scots House contain tapestries, oil paintings,
furniture, arms and armour and some of Mary's possessions,
http://www.aboutscotland.com/history/mqsh1.html

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The building clearly shows alterations and modifications
carried out over past centuries.

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We noticed this garden nearby, so we bought sandwiches & drinks in the supermarket and
enjoyed our quiet lunch in this historic setting.

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A group of followers of St Francis of Assissi, known as Observant Fransiscans, opened a number of religious houses in Scotland in the later 15th century. The last of these, at Jedburgh, was in existence by 1505AD.
This house suffered badly in a series of English attacks on Jedburgh, mostly notable in 1523, 1544 and 1545. The last of these raids was particularly destructive and the friary was amongst a list of places described as "brent, rased and caste down". The friary may not have been properly repaired after this final attack and may have closed before the Reformation in 1560. In the following years, all of the buildings were demolished and the stones reused elsewhere in the town. The site was excavated by archaeologists during the early 1980s and was laid out as a garden in 1993.
www.scottishbordersheritage.co.uk

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Jedburgh Abbey, a ruined Augustinian abbey which was founded in the 12th century is situated in the town of Jedburgh, in the Scottish Borders just 10 miles (16 km) north of the border with England at Carter Bar.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jedburgh_Abbey

Jedburgh Abbey is one of the four great abbeys built in Scotland’s border country during the Middle Ages. It was established as a priory of Augustinian canons around 1138. The brethren possibly came here from St. Quentin Abbey, near Beauvais, France. The priory was raised to abbey status around 1154.
Augustinians were priests who lived a secluded and contemplative life, but who went forth from their cloister to minister to the people.
Jedburgh eventually possessed about 20 parish churches.
www.historic-scotland.gov.uk
 

 

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Linlithgow is a historic Royal Burgh located in the central lowlands of Scotland - about 20 miles from Edinburgh.
It was the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots and the preserved ruins of the Royal Palace can be visited in a picturesque setting next to Linlithgow Loch.
www.linlithgow.com

 

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Linlithgow Palace is perhaps best known as the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots. As it turned out, the infant queen remained only seven months at Linlithgow before being taken by her mother to the greater security of Stirling Castle.
It was another 20 years before she returned!
www.marie-stuart.co.uk/Castles/Linlithgow.htm

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The palace is situated next to Linlithgow Loch.

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A royal manor house probably existed on the site from the mid-12th century, when King David I founded the burgh. At the start of the 14th century it was held by the English and King Edward I had a castle built on the site.
It was returned to the Scots after the battle of Bannockburn in 1314 and was once more used as a royal manor.
A fire in 1424 destroyed the town of Linlithgow along with the parish church and the manor house. King James I ordered the construction of a new palace and much of what he built still remains. Later kings continued to repair, amend and add to the building.
The palace of James I had ranges on three sides of a square courtyard. This courtyard was enclosed by King James IV who added a new range on the previously open west side.
During the reign of James V the main entrance to the palace was moved from the east to the south side.
When King James VI came to power, Linlithgow Palace had been neglected for many years and in 1607 the north range collapsed. Eleven years later the king finally started repair work and the whole north range was rebuilt in the Renaissance style.
In 1603, after the Union of the Crowns of Scotland and England, the royalcourt moved to London. King James VI never returned to Linlithgow and although it was visited by later kings, including Charles I and II, it had seen its best days and slowly fell into decay.
In 1746 the troops of the duke of Cumberland's army, led by General Hawley, retreated to the palace following their defeat by the Jacobites at the nearby battle of Falkirk. When they left the palace they failed to put out the fires they had made to dry themselves and the building caught alight and burnt down! The palace was never restored.
http://www.castlexplorer.co.uk/scotland/linlithgow/linlithgow.php

 

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Personally, I found this one of the nicest castles ruines we've visited this trip: well documented
by explanatory placards, no crowds and the kind cashier showed us how the Explorer Pass saved us money!

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Mary Stuart was born at Linlithgow Palace on 7th December 1542, the daughter of James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise. Six days after her birth her father died, and she became Queen of Scotland. From her infancy, Scotland's rival pro-English and pro-French factions plotted to gain control of Mary. Her French mother was chosen as regent, and she sent Mary to France in 1548.
Mary lived as part of the French royal family. In April 1558 she married the Dauphin Francis; she secretly agreed to bequeath Scotland to France if she should die without a son. In July 1559 Francis succeeded his father becoming King Francis II and Mary became Queen of France as well as of Scotland. In addition, many Roman Catholics recognised Mary Stuart as Queen of England after Mary I died and the Protestant Elizabeth I succeeded her to the throne in November 1558.
More.. www.marie-stuart.co.uk

Also: www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/367467/Mary

 

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Thaler... Daaler... Daalder (Dutch)... Dollar!
See what I wrote on this subject, on My Blog

 

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Blackness Castle is a 15th century fortress, near the village of Blackness, Scotland, on the south shore of the Firth of Forth. It was built, probably on the site of an earlier fort, by Sir George Crichton in the 1440s. At this time, Blackness was the main port serving the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, one of the main residences of the Scottish monarch.
The castle, together with the Crichton lands, passed to King James II of Scotland in 1453, and the castle has been crown property ever since.
Because of its site, jutting into the Forth, and its long, narrow shape, the castle has been characterised as 'the ship that never sailed'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackness_Castle

 

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The sun briefly peeked through the clouds and lighted up the landscape

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Adding a bit of colour to the landscape..

 

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One of the many pubs we visited for lunch or dinner. This was an establishment in Stirling.

 

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James V’s Palace at Stirling is one of the finest and best-preserved Renaissance buildings in Great Britain. Following a major programme of research and re-presentation, it can now be seen by visitors much as it may have looked on completion around 1545.
The decoration of the Palace’s six main rooms is overwhelmingly colourful, rich and elaborate.
James and his French wife Mary of Guise aimed to present themselves as wealthy, learned and sophisticated.
www.stirlingcastle.gov.uk

 

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Several Scottish Kings and Queens have been crowned at Stirling, including Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1543. There have been at least eight sieges of Stirling Castle, including several during the Wars of Scottish Independence, with the last being in 1746, when Bonnie Prince Charlie unsuccessfully tried to take the castle.
Under the early Stewart kings Robert II (reigned 1371–1390) and Robert III reigned 1390–1406), the earliest surviving parts of the castle were built.
Robert Stewart, Earl of Menteith, Regent of Scotland as brother of Robert III, undertook works on the north and south gates. The present north gate is built on these foundations of the 1380s, the earliest surviving masonry in the castle. In 1424, Stirling Castle was part of the jointure marriage settlement) given to James I's wife Joan Beaufort, establishing a tradition which later monarchs continued.
After James' murder in 1437, Joan took shelter here with her son, the young James II.
Fifteen years later, it was at Stirling Castle that James stabbed and killed the Earl of Douglas, when the latter refused to end a potentially treasonous alliance with the Earl of Ross and the Earl of Crawford.
James III (reigned 1460–1488) was born here, and later undertook works to the gardens and the chapel royal. The manufacture of artillery in the castle is recorded in 1475.
James' wife, Margaret of Denmark, died in Stirling Castle in 1486, and two years later James himself died at the Battle of Sauchieburn,fought over almost the same ground as the Battle of Bannockburn, just to the south of the castle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_Castle

 

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The castle has many outside decorations; the insert shows how it looked with white-wash applied: even nicer!
The 'golden' part of the castle stands out, but can also easily be seen from many miles away.

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The interior of Stirling Castle is richly decorated.

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Intricate wooden ornaments such as these were widely used throughout the castle.

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A decorative detail from the ceiling of a particular room.

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Perched on top of a volcanic rock overlooking the River Forth, Stirling Castle is one of the most impressive castles in Scotland.
Probably best known for its place in the Braveheart story, the castle has a rich history having been attacked on several occasions. It has also seen the baptisms and coronations of a number of Scottish Monarchs, including Mary, Queen of Scots.
Most of the buildings that remain today were constructed between the 16th and early 18th centuries.
http://www.britishcastle.co.uk/index.php?pageId=StirlingCastle_theCastle

 

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Robert I (11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), often known as Robert the Bruce
(Medieval Gaelic: Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis;
Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys), was King of Scots from
March 25, 1306, until his death in 1329.

His paternal ancestors were of Scoto-Norman heritage (originating in Brix,
Manche, Normandy), and his maternal of Franco-Gaelic. He became one of
Scotland's greatest kings, as well as one of the most famous warriors of
his generation, eventually leading Scotland during the Wars of Scottish
Independence against the Kingdom of England.
Today in Scotland, Bruce is remembered as a national hero.
His body is buried in Dunfermline Abbey, while his heart is buried in
Melrose Abbey. His embalmed heart was to be taken on crusade by his
lieutenant and friend Sir James Douglas to the Holy Land, but only reached
Moorish Granada, where it acted as a talisman for the Scottish contingent
at the Battle of Teba.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Bruce

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We rested our weary legs & feet at the lunchroom, enjoying coffee & cakes

 
 

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Cambuskenneth Abbey is a ruined Augustinian monastery located on an area of land enclosed by a meander of the River Forth near Stirling in Scotland.
The abbey is largely reduced to its foundations.
Cambuskenneth Abbey was founded by order of King David I, around the year 1140. Dedicated to the Virgin Mary, it was initially known as the Abbey of St. Mary of Stirling and sometimes simply as Stirling Abbey.
Cambuskenneth was one of the more important abbeys in Scotland, due in part to its proximity to the Royal Burgh of Stirling, a leading urban centre of the country and sometime capital. Its status as a royal abbey in the neighbourhood of a major national stronghold may be compared to that of Holyrood Abbey vis à vis Edinburgh. Royalty, including English King Edward and later Scottish King Robert the Bruce, prayed regularly at the abbey.
Bruce held his parliament there in 1326, to confirm the succession of his son David.
In 1486 Margaret of Denmark died at nearby Stirling Castle and was buried at the abbey. In 1488 her husband King James the Third was murdered at the Battle of Sauchieburn and his body was brought to Cambuskenneth Abbey for burial.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambuskenneth_Abbey
 

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The National Wallace Monument (generally known as the Wallace
Monument
) is a tower standing on the summit of Abbey Craig, a hilltop near
Stirling in Scotland. It commemorates Sir William Wallace, the 13th century
Scottish hero.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Monument

 

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The Abbey, whose foundation goes back to 1072, was built by King David I of
Scotland in honour of his mother the saintly Queen Margaret. The Abbey has
a very long history dating back to 800 AD.
www.dunfermlineabbey.co.uk

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The church occupies the site of the ancient chancel and transepts of a large medieval Benedictine abbey, which was sacked in 1560 during the Scottish Reformation and permitted to fall into disrepair. Part of the old abbey church continued in use at that time and some parts of the abbey infrastructure still remain to this day. Dunfermline Abbey is one of
Scotland's most important cultural sites.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunfermline_Abbey

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Dunfermline (Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Phàrlain) is a former burgh and town in Fife. The town grew from the influence of Queen Margaret as an important eccestrial burgh in Scotland. Until the mid-15th century, the town was also the capital of Scotland. The passing of an act in 1603 saw the end of the eccestrial status held in the town which led to decline.
Pictish and Celtic names in the Dunfermline area are multiple. For example, the 'bal' (a dwelling) found in Balmule and Balclune; the prefix 'caer' (a castle) found in Carnock (caer-knock), Cairneyhill and Keirsbeath and Pittencrieff and Pitreative from 'pit'. Dunfermline is derived from 'Dun' (fortified hill), 'fiaram' (bent or crooked) and 'lin' (a cascade or pool).
King Malcolm III accepted marriage to Queen Margaret in 1069 as his second wife, after she met him in his royal residence, which would became the site of Dunfermline Palace.
The town's name was first recorded as 'Dunfermelitane' in the confirmation charters by David I in 1128. The name of 'Dunfermline' was not officially adopted until 1609 but references had been made in the seals and badges of the royal coat of arms. Dunfermline was credited as a 'menus burgh' by David II with evidence suggesting that burgh of barony status took place between 1124 and 1147. Royal burgh status was later granted by James VII in 1588.
The relocation of the Scottish courts to London being the result of the union of the crowns drawn up in 1603 saw the loss of the city's royal connections.
A subsequent fire, in 1624, saw a large part of the city in ruin, before being deprived of the eccestrial centre along with St Andrews by the Reformation. Dunfermline quickly sank into decline...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Dunfermline

 

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This cellar is the only part of the castle which still has a roof on it.

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In centuries past nobles and knights walked these grounds!

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Written in stone...

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The cathedral dwarfs the ruined remains of the castle

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Robert the Bruce is buried here in Dunfermline Abbey, but his heart is buried in Melrose Abbey.

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A cast was made of the skull of King Robert the Bruce, a tribute I suppose..

 

 

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Loch Leven Castle

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Loch Leven Castle is a ruined castle on an island in Loch Leven, in the Perth and Kinross region of Scotland. Possibly built around 1300, the castle saw military action during the Wars of Scottish Independence (1296–1357). In the later 14th century the castle was granted to William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas, and remained in Douglas hands for the next
300 years. Mary, Queen of Scots, was imprisoned here in 1567–1568, and forced to abdicate, before escaping with the help of her gaoler's family.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Leven_Castle

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Loch Leven - Scotland 2011

It is on this island that Mary gave birth for the second time. It is disputed at what stage of pregnancy she was. Mary herself allegedly said that she was seven months pregnant in July, which would mean that she was already with Bothwell months before Darnley's murder. The second dispute is over what happened to the child. The most widely accepted theory as narrated by Claude Nau, her secretary who wrote under her authority, is that there were stillborn twins who were buried on the island.
Nevertheless, another version, found in Castelnau's memoirs, is that Mary gave birth later to a daughter who was smuggled out of Lochleven and sent to France.

Mary's French relatives would have sent her to a convent in Soissons where she became a nun. Although improbable, the story is not impossible. Whatever the truth, Mary did fall very ill on the island, and it was in this weakened and vulnerable state that Moray sent Lords Ruthven, Melville and Lindsay to present her with abdication papers. She was forced to sign them under threat from Lindsay on 24 July 1567. Forever wanting to see the good in people, Mary continued her plea to Moray who deceitful as always, maintained that he kept her in Lochleven for her own safety.
http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Places/lochlevencastle.htm

 

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"..To the memory of Robert Bruce, Captain in her majesty's 21st Royal North British Fusiliers
Eldest son of Thomas Bruce Esq of Arnot, Kinross-shire N B
Who died at sea on the 23th July 1863 and was buried at St Thomas's
the 29th of the same month aged 27 years
Even so father, for so it seemed good in thy sight "

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The best B&B we had during our two weeks: Burnbank B&B, 79 Muirs, Kinross website
Except a nice room and an excellent bed, we had a truly great cooked breakfast (choice of items from menu), we could pay with credit card (at many places I found I needed to pay cash and had to shop for an ATM first), tv in the room as well as complimentary coffee, tea and two small bottlea of water, a nice lounge looking out into the garden, wireless internet, and, last but not least, the very hospitable hosts Trevor and Ann.
My recommended choice of stay in this area!

 

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A visit to Edinburgh earlier this year brought me in contact with a truly magnificent stout: 'Old Engine Oil'.
Inquiries with the brewery led to an email exchange plus an invitation to visit when/if in the area at some point in time.
Well, that did not fall on deaf ears and I included the Harviestoun brewery in my itinerary of this trip.
We made our way to the Industrial Estate of Alva. Upon arrival, we found in the lobby proof of the successes of the Harviestoun brews (only a few rewards depicted here)! Esspecially 'Bitter & Twisted' seemed to do very well indeed!
We were entertained by Amy, one of the three brewers of Harviestoun, and she made us smell the different hops (I preferred the English hop over the ones from USA and Slovenia) and showed us the various stages involved in the making of beer.
Since then I have had a few tastes of 'Bitter & Twisted' and can testify that this is indeed a winner!
Grateful to Chris Miller for the invite and Amy for her time and the wonderfully informative tour! Thank you!

On a side note: after our visit I texted our son, who works in a specialty-pub in Amsterdam; he replied he'd had a customer that day who asked for 'Old Engine Oil', first ever request since he worked there! Pity he had to disappoint, but he did have 'Bitter & Twisted' on offer!
 

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www.harviestoun.com

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The barrels are still filled by hand, such is the small scale of this brewery

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Pallets were on standby to be shipped; I noticed adresses in Scandinavia.

 

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Castle Campbell is a mediæval castle situated above the town of Dollar, Clackmannanshire in central Scotland. It was the seat of the Earls and Dukes of Argyll, chiefs of Clan Campbell.
The tower house was built in the late 15th century and was known as Castle Gloom...
During the Civil War James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose tried to take the castle in 1645, but failed. Campbells' luck ran out when they were faced with the choice of King or Oliver Cromwell. Initially choosing the King, later the Marquis (8th Earl) of Argyll switched his allegiance to Cromwell. Cromwell's forces occupied the castle in 1653, and only part of the castle was restored after it was burned in 1654 by Scots in retaliation for Campbell's support to Cromwell.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Campbell
 

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That must have been a nice place to sit: in the sunlight falling through the window and at a heated fire in the fireplace!

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Restorations were in progress; work is being done here on a chimney

 

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The building is largely 13th century in date. This tower (originally a free-standing bell-tower dating to the 11th century) was increased in height in the 15th century, a change clearly visible in the colour of the stonework, and in the late gothic style of the upper storey's windows.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_Cathedral

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Dunblane Cathedral, built upon a Christian site first established by Saint
Blane around the year 600, is one of the few surviving medieval churches in Scotland.
www.dunblanecathedral.org.uk

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While the organ has many historic details, the actual organ needed replacement and
this one was newly made in 1990, by Flentrop in Zaandam,the Netherlands.

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The woodwork (benches, statues, etc) has many intricate details.

The Cathedral was once the seat of the bishops of Dunblane (also sometimes called 'of Strathearn'), until the abolition of bishops after the Scottish Reformation. There are remains of the vaults of the episcopal palace to the south of the cathedral. Technically, it is no longer a cathedral, as there are no bishops in the Church of Scotland, which is a Presbyterian denomination.
Unusually, the building is owned by the Crown, and is looked after by Historic Scotland (no entrance charge).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_Cathedral
 

 

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Situated on an island in the middle of Lake Menteith, the only 'Lake' in Scotland, Inchmahome Priory is a ruined Augustine (The Black Cannons) priory founded in 1238 by Walter Comyn, who was the Earl of Menteith. The Earl is likely to have founded the monastery for the good of his soul, and to show of his status as an important landowner.
The priory would also provide his family with a final resting place befitting of his grandeur! The island is reached by a boat from the pier at the Port of Menteith.
The priory has had many distinguished royal visitors; Robert the Bruce came here three times in 1306, 1308 and 1310, probably for political motives, as the first abbot had sworn allegiance to Edward the I, the English King. The priory was also a refuge for Mary Queen of Scots, who stayed here in 1547.
She was only four years old at the time, and stayed for three weeks, mainly for her own safety after the disastrous battle of Pinkie in September of that year.
www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/scotland/perthshire/featured-sites/inchmahome-priory.html
 

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The name "Inchmahome" comes from the Gaelic Innis MoCholmaig, meaning Island of St Colmaig.

The decline of the monastic orders in the 16th century was hastened by the fact that the heads of abbeys and priories became appointees of the local landowner, who often did not share the religious goals of the monks or ordained priests.
Although most of the buildings are now ruins, much of the original 13th century structure remains, and it is now in the care of Historic Scotland, who maintain and preserve it as an important historic site.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchmahome_Priory

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This was the only place which had a fireplace..

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If I remember correctly, I think the monks that stayed here had made a vow of silence and used sign language for communication. A very quiet and tranquil place indeed.

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Nothing to do with our interest in the history of Mary Stuart, but rather retracing our own roots...

Carmichael House, the caput of the barony, was a stately three-story family mansion with beautiful grounds and gardens for over 200 years, but it fell into disrepair in recent generations and is now in ruins.

The last family member to reside in Carmichael House was Sir Windham Carmichael-Anstruther, the 25th Baron of Carmichael, until the Second World War when it was used as a billet for Polish army forces, the start of its demise. After the war, due to oppressive taxes, it was sold for a nursing home, but that enterprise went bankrupt in 1950 when the house was bought back by Sir Windham. In 1952 he removed the roof to reduce the property taxes, and he held a demolition sale when doors, windows, and furnishings were sold, leaving only the walls still standing.

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Carmichael house – built in 1734, it replaced a tower destroyed by Cromwell. The corridor linking the two wings was added later and removed the need to have a carriage on stand-by to provide transport between them.
www.visitlanarkshire.com/things-to-do/walking/Carmicheal-Estate-History-Walk-Route/

 

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It was built in 1734 by Sir John Carmichael (‘The Great Earl’), third Earl of Hyndford and fourth Lord Carmichael (1701-1767), to replace the former castle built by William, second Baron of Carmichael, about 1414, and ruined by Cromwell about 1650.

The third Earl was a man of great accomplishments including extensive government service as the British Envoy to Prussia and Russia; Knight of the Thistle; member of the King’s Privy Council; Lord of the Bedchamber; and Ambassador to Russia.
He was also noted as an agricultural innovator, making large expenditures to plant trees and gardens and to improve the soil at Carmichael Estate. A curling pond provided winter sport and spectator enjoyment, and one of the finest surviving dovecots in Great Britain provided meat during the harsh Scottish winters.

Surrounding sites of historical note include the mausoleum at Kirkhill, where generations of former clan chiefs are interred at the site of the original Caer Mychel church dedicated by Queen Margaret in 1068; the 'new' Carmichael church which was re-located a mile away in 1750; and the family pet cemetery.

Clan Carmichael USA started a Roof Restoration Capital Campaign in 2000 to solicit tax-exempt donations to repair and re-roof the mansion before it collapses.
In the summer of 2002 a team of Clan Carmichael USA volunteers traveled to Scotland and built a new roof for the tower, naming it 'Helton’s Tower', in honor of their beloved founding member and former President Helton Carmichael, who had passed away the previous year.
The Capital Campaign will continue until the project is completed.

Currently the Chief and his family live in the old butler quarters at West Mains.
http://www.carmichael.org/CarmichaelEstate.asp

 

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The gutted interior provides for some nice photography.

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THE ROAD GOES ON FOREVER: PART TWO, ENGLAND 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

Created: 01AUG11 - Updated: 7 September, 2011