USA 2012

PEARSON AVIATION MUSEUM,
Vancouver,WA

Copyright Ruud Leeuw Photos © R.Leeuw


Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Field is the oldest operating airfield in the USA...
In 1905 an airship, piloted by Lincoln Beachey, used the site. Six years later an aircraft took off from the polo fields of the Vancouver Barracks. The Army Air Service set up a base in 1921 and an adjoining civil field was constructed.
Lieutenant Alexander Pearson, a local resident, won the 1919 speed contest from New York to San Francisco and back. He also undertook the first aerial survey of the Grand Canyon, and was killed in 1924 whilst practising for the Pulitzer Races.
The airfield was visited by the Douglas DWCs on their 1924 round-the-world flight and was also a stop on the original West Coast air mail route. On 20Jul1937 the Tupolev ANT-25 piloted by Valery Chkalov landed at Pearson after a 63-hour journey from Moscow! This was the first non-stop trans polar flight and a memorial can be seen on the southside of the field.

The museum was set up in the early 1990s to preserve this rich heritage. A hangar was obtained and several local owners loaned their aircraft to the display. A move has been made to an early hangar which has been superbly restored and enlarged.

 

 

 

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum
On loan from the WAAAM (see my report on this museum), the Curtiss Pusher. Its claim to fame is two fold:
It was flown in 1912 from the roof of the Multnomah Hotel in Portland, piloted by Silas Christofferson.
And in 1995 this was done again, in a full blown airworthy replica (this one?), piloted by Tom Murphy.
Or is this one the original, and the one on the ceiling of WAAAM the 1995 replica?
Another replica can be found in Evergreen's Aviation and Space Museum, in McMinnville,OR.

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum
The above image was taken from the video footage shown in the museum (two images pasted together by me).

Pearson Air Museum
Imagine taking off from a rooftop in a contraption like this..? Would you?

 

 

 

Pearson Air Museum
Voisin LA-III (Replica) N176V; the website of the museum states only three exist in the world.

 

Pearson Air Museum
Another good view of the 'flying' Voisin LA-III. On the ground left: deHavilland DH.82C Tiger Moth N4030E
(c/n DHC.903) and foreground Fleet 7 NC794V (c/n 375).

Pearson Air Museum
Fokker Dr I (Replica) N43SB (c/n 29590ABV)

Pearson Air Museum
deHavilland DH.82C Tiger Moth N4030E (c/n DHC.903)

Pearson Air Museum

Pearson Air Museum
Fleet 7 NC794V (c/n 375)

The Fleet Model 1 (originally the Consolidated Model 14 Husky Junior) and its derivatives were a family of two-seat trainer and sports plane produced in the United States and Canada in the 1920s and 30s.
They all shared the same basic design and varied mainly in their powerplants and were all orthodox biplanes with staggered, single-bay wings of equal span and fixed tailskid undercarriage.
Accommodation was provided for two in tandem, originally sharing a single open cockpit, but in most examples in separate open cockpits.
Wikipedia has more on this aircraft and variants; the museum lists it as a Fleet 2, but my Air-Britain has it as a Fleet 7 - Wikipedia explains the modifications in a chapter on 'variants'.

Pearson Air Museum
The Fleet 7 NC794V seen from above

Pearson Air Museum
Ryan PT-21 Recruit N48778 (c/n 1057)

Pearson Air Museum
Another shot of the Ryan PT-21 Recruit: note that beautiful wooden prop!

T. Claude Ryan was the founder of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, the 2nd incarnation of a company with this name, and the 4th company with which he had been involved to bear his name.
The first, Ryan Airlines, was the manufacturer of the Ryan NYP, more famously known as the Spirit of St. Louis.
He began the development of the ST (for 'Sport Trainer', and also known as S-T), the first design of the company, in 1933.
PT-21 was a military variant and a production version of the ST-3; 100 were built.
WIKIPEDIA, more..


Pearson Air Museum
Foreground: Cessna 170B N3241A (c/n 25885). In the back SNJ-5 Texan and (right) North American T-28A Trojan

Pearson Air Museum
North American T-28A Trojan N302NA, registered 31aug06 Pearson Air Museum (but I've seen photos of
an earlier date showing this T-28A residing here; privately owned?). Serial 51-3725A, manufactured 1951.
Don't overlook that tiny Polen Special N106P (c/n 101)...

 

Pearson Air Museum
North American NA-88 Texan (AT-6D, SNJ-5) N7979C 'Old No.7' (c/n 88-16498); ex/ 42-84717, BuNo.84827

 

 

Pearson Air Museum
The small yellow plane is Oldfield Baby Great Lakes N22872 (c/n 7411-M-542B)
In red, the impressive BOEING/MEHRER A75N1 N8012E (c/n 75-3040-A4) 'Lady Anna'
I regretted to find WACO ASO N4W missing from the display; maybe planes were traded?
On the right, with the folded wings: Schweizer SGS 1-26D N7710S, a glider.
In the foreground, left, Trotter WSA.1 N34517 (c/n 001), but I don't really know what that is..

Pearson Air Museum
That beautiful red biplane in the background is BOEING/MEHRER A75N1 N8012E (c/n 75-3040-A4) 'Lady Anna'; could this be the "Boeing-Stearman PT-27 Kaydet N58617 (c/n 75-3937, ex/ 42-15748)" which my Air-Britain guidebook had listed here.?

Pearson Air Museum
Forney 415C N28942 (c/n 37); registered 09May1979 to Anita A Tallent of Warner Robins,GA (registry expired)

Pearson Air Museum
The early flight simulator..

 

Pearson Air Museum
A target drone; the one that got away..?!!

 

ANT-25 record flight into Pearson Field
This photo was take from the museum's website; although there is no airplane present to commemmorate the
arrival of the record braking Russians, there is a very nice display you should not miss when visiting this museum!

Pearson Air Museum

 

 

Useful links:
www.fortvan.org/pages/pearson-air-museum
This museum on Wikipedia

For much of the above information I am indebted to Bob Ogden's wonderful guidebook: Aviation Museum and Collections of North America (Air-Britain Historians, 2011)


 

 

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USA 2012

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